Why long-term sustainability trumps cheap input production methods

Here’s why I spent half my life upside down. I fell into the cheap-input philosophy easily and took years to see and understand the flaws.

I spent close to 50% of my adult life on the wrong agriculture boat.

There were a number of reasons for this being the case. The number one reason likely was World War II or maybe Harry Truman. When Truman assumed the presidency in March 1945 he had never heard of the Manhattan Project.

Four and a half months later the two big caps popped and the Japanese warlords decided to throw in the towel. They hollered "calf rope" and our government and much of the technical world went to peddling acidified nitrogen, phosphorus and potash (NP&K) from ammunitions production into agriculture in a big way.

Hybrid corn would out-produce open-pollinated varieties with chemical fertilization plus water. Everyone seemed to forget about organic matter and soil health. The new fertilizer was cheap, fuel was cheap, equipment was affordable, and water could be found in underground aquifers and pumped.

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