5 resources for choosing the best method to control noxious weeds

5 resources for choosing the best method to control noxious weeds

The old adage, “The early bird gets the worm,” certainly applies to controlling noxious weeds in pastures. We’ve been tackling that issue on our ranch this week, and although we might be off to a slow start, there’s still time to manage the problem of thistles before things get out of hand.

Photo Credit: Flickr user John Flannery

As a kid, I spent many hours with a machete in hand chopping thistles in our summer pastures. Although spraying is always a quick and easy way to manage noxious weeds, my dad was always a firm believer in doing the least obtrusive method first. Being mindful of the bees, the worms, and the eco-system of native grasslands, thwarting thistles the old-fashioned way by chopping them down at the base is our first method of defense.

Of course, there are many ways to proactively and effectively kill thistles and other summer weeds. Choosing the best method means considering the terrain, the extent of the problem, allotted time, available labor, and any budget restraints.

I’ve rounded up five BEEF resources to help you choose the best method of attack for stopping noxious weeds in their tracks. Here are a few blogs and articles worth revisiting:

1. 3 tips for stalking and stopping the wily musk thistle 

2. Tips for controlling red cedar and musk thistle

3. Which thistle do you spray for best return on investment? 

4. Producers have several options for musk thistle control

5. Pricklypear control helps replenish pastures

What are your preferred methods for managing the spread of noxious weeds? Share your advice in the comments section below.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

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TAGS: Cow-Calf
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