7 ways Dr. Oz is lying to you about red meat

7 ways Dr. Oz is lying to you about red meat

If you don’t want your blood to boil this morning, you should probably stop reading this blog post now before it’s too late.

TV personality Dr. Oz has struck again — this time blaming red meat consumption on making us obese, clogging your arteries, damaging your brain, leading to cancer, causing Type-2 diabetes, and he even threw in ruining your sex life and causing wrinkles for good measure — and he couldn’t be more WRONG!

Photo Credit: Flickr user David Berkowitz www.flickr.com/photos/davidberkowitz

A reader recently sent our BEEF editorial team an article written by celebrity physicians Dr. Oz and Dr. Roizen titled, “How to kick your dangerous red meat habit.” In the article, the doctors challenge readers to reduce their red meat consumption to one serving a week at most. The article includes tips for substituting skinless chicken, vegetarian options and fish instead of red meat.

I don’t know about you, but I’m sick and tired of poor science, fear-mongering and celebrities trying to increase ratings on their TV shows by telling Americans how to eat. Here are the facts, with sources for more information, to negate his claims:

1. Obesity

America’s expanding waistline has been a growing problem since the 1970s, which is coincidentally the same time the USDA Food Guide Pyramid advised Americans to eat less saturated fats and consume more carbs. As low-fat and non-fat products were created and grew in popularity, the amount of meat we consume in this country has gone down.

READ: Meat MythCrushers video addresses misconceptions about red meat & obesity

By the way, in 2012 Dr. Oz said meat was not to blame for the obesity epidemic. Read more about it here. 

2. Heart disease

A study which appeared in the Journal of Nutrition found that increasing your daily intake of protein-rich foods that contain certain amino acids reduces the risk of heart disease as much as giving up smoking. Specifically, researchers found that eating a 75-gram portion of steak was effective in reducing arterial stiffness.

READ: New study shows how beef can improve heart health

3. Brain function

In an article for AuthorityNutrition.com, Kris Gunnars, a medical student and personal trainer, lists the five brain nutrients that are only found in meat, fish and eggs, but not plants, including: Vitamin B12, Creatine, Vitamin D3, Carnosine, and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA).

READ: Is meat the best brain food?

Also, check out: Study finds vegetarians have small brains

4. Cancer

When the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) concluded that “red meat is probably carcinogenic to humans” last fall, they ignored a large body of evidence that says differently. In fact, the outcry by the medical community after the announcement was made was so great that WHO later backtracked on the initial report.

READ: 3 ways to disprove IARC on red meat & cancer link

5. Type-2 Diabetes

I simply cannot understand why this one continues to circulate. Beef does not spike our blood sugar readings like a candy bar would, so what’s the deal?

Gary Taubes is the author of the best-selling books, “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why We Get Fat and What To Do About It.” He explains how the obesity epidemic, which is linked to modern diseases like diabetes, was caused by our increased consumption of not animal fats but sweets. Americans consumed 75 lbs. of sugar per person per year in 1986. By the early 2000s, Americans consumed 90 pounds of sugar per person per year. It’s estimated that this number is even higher today.

“By the early 2000s, when sugar consumption peaked, one in every three Americans was obese, and 14 million were diabetic,” he said. “This correlation between sugar consumption and diabetes is what defense attorneys call circumstantial evidence. It’s more compelling than it otherwise might be, though, because the last time sugar consumption jumped markedly in this country, it was also associated with a diabetes epidemic.”

READ: Does red meat increases diabetes risk?

6. Sex

To feed your libido, Cecilia Tregear , a world-renowned physician based in London, recommends eating red meat to feed your brain, balance your hormones, and boost your energy.

“Good nutrition is essential for the healthy production of hormones which maintain the libido and allow for regular and fulfilling sexual activity,” she said.

In her “Between the Sheets” diet plan, Tregear says the amino acids and healthy fats found in foods like red meat can help folks look and feel younger and can encourage folks to be more active in the bedroom.

READ: Feed your libido! Want to perk up your love life? Start in the kitchen with food that will give you the oomph factor.

7. Wrinkles

Want to age gracefully and look beautiful from the inside out? Dr. Oz says red meat will cause wrinkles, but there are others who disagree. Take, for example, Angelina Jolie. Considered to be one of the most beautiful women in the world, this actress credits red meat as her secret for health and beauty.

READ: Angelina Jolie says red meat is her beauty secret

In addition, the Anti-Wrinkle Diet also suggests to consume red meat for collagen and zinc, which help to maintain the elasticity of our skin and promote youthfulness.

Learn more about the Anti-Wrinkle Diet here. 

What other ways can Dr. Oz possibly attack beef on his show? I’ll be ready and waiting to debunk them all, but in the meantime, feel free to share today’s blog to show the many ways that red meat in the diet can help to cure what ails you!

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

 

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