Cowgirl Fights Breast Cancer & Spreads The Word About Early Diagnosis

Just as in general society, many folks in agriculture have been impacted by a cancer diagnosis, either in themselves or someone they know. Over the years, I’ve been touched by various ways agriculturalists have shown their support for those battling cancer.

For example, a few years ago, a rancher painted all his hay bales pink in memory of his wife, who had lost her battle to breast cancer earlier that year. It was his way of honoring his beloved wife, while signaling to passersby the importance of continuing the battle to fight cancer.

 

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I recently ran across another great way in which agriculture is supporting individuals with cancer, and it’s a really neat story.

In 1999, three women -- Trish Lynn, Sadie Lynn and Hattie Claire -- started the All American Cowgirl Chicks, a rodeo act featuring jaw-dropping stunts atop of horses. The women donate the money they earn from their performances to military and cancer charities. The inspiration behind their act is Sadie Lynn, who was diagnosed at age 18 with a malignant phyllodes tumor - a rare, incurable form of breast cancer.

Check out highlights of their performances in the video below.

Inspired by Sadie’s story, Tartar Farm and Ranch Equipment developed a line of pink equipment – everything from hay feeders to corral panels. The campaign has already raised $10,000, and the money will be donated to Cancer Care Services, which helps families fighting cancer and helps bring awareness of the importance of early detection and treatment within rural communities.

Learn more about Sadie’s story and check out the pink Tartar equipment in the video below.

Sadie's Story - Ride For the Cure from Tarter on Vimeo.

I know this deviates from my regular blogging topics, but it’s an important reminder for all of us to have regular check-ups at the doctor’s office and to be our own advocates when it comes to our health. Early diagnosis is key, and cancer knows no boundaries when it comes to who it impacts. Be aware and spread the word.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of Beefmagazine.com or the Penton Farm Progress Group.

 

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