DC poitics after election

D.C. Politics: From The Farm Bill, To Fiscal Cliff, To The Estate Tax

With the Democrats in control of the Senate and the Republicans having a stronghold in the House of Representatives, we likely can expect a gridlock on most issues that will arise in the next two years. But how much damage can Congress do if they can’t agree on anything, right?

Unfortunately for agriculture, when it comes to Washington, D.C. politicians, there is a lot on the horizon that could negatively impact farmers and ranchers.

WTVY.com reports that “fiscal cliff,” budget and farm bill talks have resumed this week in Washington, D.C. “A farm bill that stalled in Congress before the election could see quick action by the end of the year if congressional leaders decide they need its spending cuts to make a deal for averting the fiscal cliff.

“The farm bill passed by the Senate in June would save $23 billion over 10 years, while a version passed by the House Agriculture Committee in July would save $35 billion. The savings come from cuts to farm subsidies and food stamp programs.

“That pot of money could be useful to lawmakers who will be scrambling in the year's final weeks to address the combination of tax increases and automatic spending cuts due in January -- dubbed the fiscal cliff because the combination could plunge the economy into another recession.”

A Closer Look: What Obama Win Means For Agriculture 

This week’s poll on the beefmagazine.com homepage asks, “What political issues concern you the most?”

With 95 votes in so far, readers could select two of the five concerns listed. The biggest concern is the upcoming fiscal cliff with 41% of the votes, followed by expanded regulations that would be harmful to agriculture and estate tax changes with 35% of the votes. Another 25% are worried about federal tax increases, and 19% say passing the farm bill is a big priority.

Vote in the poll here.

What issues are most concerning to you and why? Which item will most impact your farm or ranch? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

TAGS: Regulatory
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