Don’t forget to enter BEEF’s “Celebrating Hard Working Cattle Producers” photo contest!

Don’t forget to enter BEEF’s “Celebrating Hard Working Cattle Producers” photo contest!

Confucius once said, “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” Ranching is one of those career choices that certainly takes a large amount of work, but the majority of ranchers I know don’t worry about the long days, nor do they feel like retiring by a certain age. They keep plugging away at it, day after day, year after year, no matter the markets, weather or other challenges they face.

READ: 10 traits of a hard-working rancher

This month, we are celebrating hard-working beef producers with a photo contest. We’ve put together an awesome photo contest, and two lucky readers will take home $300 cowboy hats, courtesy of contest sponsor, Greeley Hat Works.

For complete contest details, click here.

Photo Credit: Nora Kougl

We’ve already received several entries from readers, but we need more to really make this gallery a great one. There’s still time to send me a photo. Tomorrow was the final day to accept submissions, but we are extending the deadline through the weekend.

To view the gallery of reader photos, click here.

To enter, simply email [email protected] with a photo and your name, address and a title or caption for the image.

One entry per person please. Helpful hint: if you have several photos you would like to enter, consider submitting them under a family member’s name. In previous contests, we have had many families submit multiple images this way.

Thanks for participating in this contest. I look forward to seeing your entries. Remember the deadline is Sunday, September 20. Be sure to check back Tuesday to see which photographers made the list of finalists.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

 

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