Hay Talk Part 2: 6 resources for making haylage-in-a-day & bale grazing, processing

I may be in the minority, but spending the dog days of summer in the tractor cutting and baling hay isn’t my idea of a good time. However, there are ways to get the job done more efficiently while putting up higher-quality hay. In July, I’m focusing my Thursday blog posts on haying season.

In case you missed the first installment of my “Hay Talk” series for July, check out: Why cutting height and moisture levels matter

In this week’s installment, I’ve rounded up six resources that explore haylage-in-a-day and bale grazing and processing.

Haylage-in-a-day

In some areas, excessive moisture is putting a damper on haying season. Although putting up haylage in a day requires more equipment and labor, many are turning to this method to avoid putting up moldy hay. Here are a few resources on this topic.

1. “Wide swaths work for both hay and haylage” by Dan Understander for Hay & Forage Grower

2. “5 ways to mess up haylage-in-a-day” by John Vogel for Beef Producer

3. “Haylage & baleage are alternatives to dry hay” by South Dakota State University iGrow

Bale grazing & processing

A less labor-intensive method to feed cows during the winter, bale grazing and processing can also be used in times of drought to better manage the nutrients in the soil. Here are a few resources on this topic.

4. “Bale grazing lets cows feed themselves” by Heath Smith Thomas for BEEF

5. “Bale grazing and processing best at battling drought” by Jennifer Blair for Alberta Farm Express

6. “Bale grazing — less work, better return” featured on the Angus Beef Bulletin

Feel free to browse these resources and add your own tips in the comments section below.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

 

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