meatless monday not practiced at penn state

It’s "Meat-In" Monday At Penn State, Not Meat-Out

Today is Monday, and for many, it’s a day to go meatless. Some college campuses across the country have adopted the Meatless Monday routine, with their campus food services offering vegetarian lunches to kick off the students’ school week. To counteract this trend, many college students are fighting back by promoting the importance of animal protein in the diet. 

Seven years ago, former National Beef Ambassador Christie (Molinaro) Brown started a Meat-In Day at Penn State. This event created a positive buzz on campus about beef, with agricultural students offering meat sticks to their peers. This became a tradition, and seven years later, ag students are still gathering each spring to promote meat on campus.

The seventh annual Meat-In Day was held March 14 at Penn State. The theme of the event was, “My name is American farmer...Nice to MEAT you, pleased to feed you.”

“This year’s event focused on the nutritional benefits of animal products and how they provide essential nutrients,” says Amanda Mosier, this year’s student Meat-In chairperson. “It is important to continue Meat-In Day because many people are unaware of the many benefits of consuming meat and dairy products in their everyday diets. As in past years, the goal is always to encourage students and faculty to consume animal products by showing them that the products are safe and have health benefits.”

Mosier is an animal science student, with an agricultural business management minor. She is vice president of the Collegiate Cattlewomen and serves as the livestock chair for Block and Bridle. She hopes to find a job in industry relations or nutrition upon graduation. For Mosier, being a part of Meat-In Day makes sense, and she worked hard to get the word out.

 

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“We put an article on the Penn State Animal Sciences website and in the Penn State College of Ag student newsletter,” she says. “We also sold shirts designed with the event theme to anyone who was interested, so they could wear them on the day of the event.”

Cheers to the students at Penn State for taking an active role in promoting the animal agriculture industry on campus. It certainly takes a lot of time and effort to put on an event like this, and we all should appreciate their efforts.

Does your college campus push Meatless Mondays? If so, what are some tactics and tools you use to balance the conversation?

 

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