Survey reveals consumer attitudes about new food technologies

If you remember the popular “Back to the Future” movies, you might recall that in the second movie, which debuted in 1989, Marty McFly and his friends took a trip to Oct. 21, 2015.

Back then, 26 years ago, that future day seemed lightyears away, but the internet is having a great time reminiscing about the popular movies and discussing the accuracies of the future the movie predicted.

Photo Credit: "Back to the Future" movie

In honor of the Back to the Future date, the International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation surveyed 1,000 American consumers about their attitudes toward future food technologies.

In the 2015 Food & Health Survey, consumers were asked, “If you time-traveled 30 years into the future and found that a number of hypothetical food technologies had been developed, which would you be excited to try?”

The results showed that today’s consumers, particularly millennials, would love to see new technologies to make fast and easy meals, including:

  • 79% would be excited to try food that has customizable nutritional value or calories.
  • 71% would be excited to try an appliance that can turn raw ingredients into any meal.
  • 69% would be excited to try a 3D printer that can make any food you want from scratch.

Perhaps this enthusiasm for convenience meals could equate to more beef sales. After all, a protein-rich beef jerky stick on the road is about as simple and easy as it gets. More than that, as new technologies emerge, there might be exciting ways to prepare beef faster and easier than ever before.

I would definitely try the 3D printer that could make any food from scratch, especially if it included steak or roast beef! How about you? Share your thoughts on emerging food preparation technologies in the comments section below.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

 

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