TV show follows lives of next generation ranchers

When I hear the phrase, “reality TV,” it’s hard not to immediately think of shows like The Bachelor, Keeping Up With The Kardashians and The Real Housewives. These faux, partially-scripted dramas showcase the lives of the rich and famous, and they aren’t even close to any reality those of us in rural America live in.

Although it doesn’t happen often, it’s always refreshing when something a little more “real” is successfully launched on TV, particularly if it celebrates agriculture. I recently watched a preview of an exciting series called “American Harvest.” After a well-received first season that followed a multi-generation farm family in Minnesota, the show is back with a second season. 


Photo Credit: CarbonTV http://www.carbontv.com/shows/american-harvest

Airing on CarbonTV, season two of American Harvest follows Leah Johnson, a full-time manager at Red River Marketing and part-time help at her family’s farm. The show also introduces us to Chad Olsen, a custom harvester who operates his business from Texas to Canada.

We also meet Josh and Liz Fiedler, who have recently taken over Josh’s family’s century-old farm after a 15-year hiatus away. A fun side note: I went to college with Liz, who also works as a nurse to support the farm, and it will be fun to watch her share her passion for agriculture unfold on the small screen.

The show follows these millennial farmers and ranchers as they tackle the challenges of volatile market swings, business risks and transitioning their operations to the next generation.

"Viewers loved season one for its authentic portrayal of the high-stakes American farming industry," says Daniel Seliger, EVP of content and marketing at CarbonTV, in a recent press release. "Season two continues the story with a focus on the passion and commitment of the next generation.”

Tune in to watch American Harvest: Next Generation by clicking here and let me know what you think. Be sure to share and help spread the word about this reality show that actually represents the reality of many who live and work in rural America.

For any millennial ranchers who are reading today’s blog, I also encourage you to check out AgUnited’s recent article titled, “10 tips for getting your start in agriculture.” Written by Rebecca Christman, the list offers advice for young people tackling the day-to-day struggles of farming and ranching. Check it out here.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

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