Beef Roundtable: Where are the premiums in the feeder cattle market?

For years, cattle producers have discussed the advantages of seeking out the premiums the market offers. Others maintain the way to capture premiums is to avoid the discounts. But what is the market looking for? What attributes and management characteristics will the next buyer along the marketing chain from the cow-calf producer pay more for? Conversely, what will bring a discount?

This edition of the Beef Roundtable, the second in a series that looks at ways to make the market work for you, explores those questions and more. This video delves into the feeder cattle market with Jennifer Houston and Jim Collins.

Jennifer and her husband run a stocker operation, commercial cow-calf herd and feed cattle in Texas and Kansas. In addition, they own and operate a livestock auction market in Sweetwater, Tenn.  Collins heads the Quinton Group, a network of economists, nutritionists, agronomists and other experts to meet the needs of a host of clients. Listen as they dissect the premiums and discounts in the feeder cattle market.

The Beef Roundtable is a joint project with BEEF and Purdue University. It’s a monthly video podcast that features some of the top leaders in the beef industry co-hosted by Ron Lemenager, Extension beef specialist at Purdue University and BEEF Senior Editor Burt Rutherford.

In addition to being available on beefmagazine.com, the sessions can be viewed at www.beefroundtable.com, on the Beef Roundtable YouTube channel and iTunes.

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