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7 ag stories you might have missed this week - May 18, 2018

China ends sorghum investigation, farm bill fails in House and neonicotinoids among topics in news this week.

Need a quick catch up on ag news? Here are seven stories you might have missed this week.

1. The top two leaders of the House Agriculture Committee have starkly different views of HR2, the Agriculture and Nutrition Act of 2018, aka, the farm bill. The bill failed to pass the House in a Friday vote. – Delta Farm Press, Farm Futures

2. The European Court of Justice ruled May 17 in favor of limits the European Commission imposed on neonicotinoids in 2013. Bayer and Syngenta issued statements opposing the ruling.  – Farm Futures 

3. Growers in the U.S. and Canada will have more options for fighting corn rootworm as a result of a licensing agreement reached by Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, and Monsanto Company. – Farm Futures

4. Six key reasons why grazing livestock are a necessity to manage, heal and build the landscape. – Beef Producer

5. Fifteen Minnesota agricultural organizations sent a joint letter to Gov. Mark Dayton and legislative leaders requesting a $50-per-acre property tax credit for farm acres that are required to be removed from production to comply with the state’s buffer law. – The Farmer 

6. A new study published in the journal Nature finds that water distribution is becoming more extreme due in part to agriculture. The study was based on data produced by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. – Newsweek 

7. China ended its anti-dumping investigation into U.S. sorghum, a move that drew praise from sorghum growers. – Farm Futures

And your bonus.

Ever visited Brazil? Missouri Ruralist Editor Mindy Ward shares photos from a recent trip to Brazil’s Agrishow. The major crops there are soybeans, corn, sugar cane and coffee. – Missouri Ruralist 

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