No nod for the prairie dog

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) completed a status review of the black-tailed prairie dog and determined the rodent doesn't warrant protection as a threatened or endangered species under the Endangered Species Act. Black-tailed prairie dogs are typically found east of the continental divide in Montana, Wyoming, the Dakotas, Oklahoma, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) completed a status review of the black-tailed prairie dog and determined the rodent doesn't warrant protection as a threatened or endangered species under the Endangered Species Act. Black-tailed prairie dogs are typically found east of the continental divide in Montana, Wyoming, the Dakotas, Oklahoma, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska.

Most estimates of black-tailed prairie dog populations are based on estimates of occupied habitat, with the most current range-wide estimate of occupied habitat being 2.4 million acres. While its historic range is estimated at 80-100 million acres, black-tailed prairie dog habitat has increased significantly since its low point of 364,000 acres in 1961.

To learn more, visit www.fws.gov/btprairiedog/.