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May Beef Month: It’s all about the kids!

In this second week of May Beef Month, here is a roundup of recent headlines featuring kids, cattle and nutritious beef!

It’s the second week of Beef Month, and there have already been some pretty amazing outreach events and promotional campaigns underway to highlight America’s cattlemen and women and how beef gets from pasture to plate.

Last week in BEEF Daily, we highlighted Cinco de Mayo beef recipes and a Beef Strong workout, created by the Minnesota Beef Council.

In case you missed it, you can read the post by clicking here.

This week, I would like to feature some of the educational projects happening across the country. You’ll notice in these recent headlines it’s all about youth and great-tasting beef! Discover how students are actively promoting beef and doing good in their communities, not just for May Beef Month but all year long!

1. “Hamburger helps hungry students” by Janelle Atyeo for Tri-State Neighbor

Here’s an excerpt: “This winter, local cattlemen with the Coteau Hills Cattlemen’s Association donated 90 pounds of ground beef to the pantry. They worked with the County Fair Food Store in Watertown, S.D., to purchase the meat at a discount, and agriculture program students at Lake Area helped out, too.

They attached facts about beef to boxes of Hamburger Helper as a way to promote beef and educate other students about agriculture. They worked to package donated food together as round, nutritious meal options.”

2. “South Dakota student helps promote beef at Harvard” by Jager Robinson for Tri-State Neighbor

Robinson writes, “During his first year at Harvard, Gordon said he’s noticed that much like reports have indicated, many people struggle to understand agriculture and how their food gets to the table. Even with that struggle, Gordon said it’s positive that students are taking the time to try to understand how their food is made and where it comes from – although there continues to be misconceptions.”

3. “High school butcher class teaches students how to cut and sell meat” by Bryan Mays for KVUE

According to the article, “Tucked behind Florence High School in northern Williamson County you'll find an interesting classroom.  It's actually more of a shop – a butcher's shop. These students are learning how to cut and serve top quality meats right in their school. Not only are they learning about the different cuts of beef, pork and lamb, they are also learning how to run a business.”

4. “Ranchers bring local beef to schools” by Amanda Radke for BEEF

In February, I wrote about how Wall Public School in Wall, S.D., worked with ranchers in a new “Beef to School” program that has put locally raised beef on the menu in the school cafeteria.

As a way to wrap up the school year and summarize the lessons learned about beef, Wall invited me to read my new children’s book, “Can-Do Cowkids,” to the elementary students.

Last Thursday, I enjoyed a great day with the students, talking about beef nutrition, by-products, cattle grazing and environmental sustainability. What perfect timing that the classroom visit also coincided with Beef Month! It was awesome to hear from the kids how much they have enjoyed beef tacos, spaghetti, stroganoff and more, made from locally raised beef!

If you have a May Beef Month promotion you would like to share, email me at amanda.radke@informa.com. We may feature your campaign on an upcoming blog!

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Farm Progress.

TAGS: Beef Quality
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