This Week in Agribusiness – Dec. 8, 2018

Max Armstrong and Steve Bridge talk USMCA and the farm bill, along with corn, soybean and livestock markets, learn about a new dozer and get insight on ethanol.

Segment 1

TWIA co-host Steve Bridge was at a Farm Bureau meeting this past week, as meetings happened across the region. Dave Salmonsen, an American Farm Bureau staffer, gives insight into the meetings, and talks about USMCA, happenings in D.C. and the farm bill.

Mark Feight, International Agribusiness Group, joins Max and Steve in studio and talks about China trade. He thinks negotiations will continue, and trade issues won’t go away, but can we do it without the tariff? And how will that impact South America?

Feight says the key number farmers need to watch is the number that China will import.

 

Segment 2

Mark Feight is back this segment, talking about the corn market and how it’s impacted by trade issues. His thought is there will be more corn acres planted next year. He’s hopeful that pork, ethanol and cotton are a part of the business next year, too.

What should farmers think for 2019? The risk is in managed money.

How bad was the hog herd decimated by the swine fever in China? The pork market is definitely sensitive to the market.

Feight is also optimistic about the dairy price, hoping we’re seeing the lows right now, and the middle part of next year prices will rebound.

He also likes the beef market and is seeing strong demand.

Colby Ag Tech

Chad Colby talks with Sam Meeker, Caterpiller, about a 30-year redesign of the Cat D6 dozer, with electric drive.

Weather

Greg Soulje talks about the weather outlook for the western U.S.

 

Segment 3

Max talks about feed rations with John Bergstrom, DSM Nutritional Products. They spoke about Vivo Vitall, a food-grade source of benzoic acid. It is shows to improve average daily gain, and has been well accepted with those who are trying and using it.

Max reminds viewers that Dec. 22-23, the show will be in Michigan to celebrate Christmas.

The Half Century of Progress is offering Show Books. You can order one via mail.

Max tweeted about President Bush, when he met him in summer 1988.

 

Segment 4

Max and Steve talk about using ethanol. Orion Samuelson spoke with Geoff Cooper, Renewable Fuels Association, about approval of E15, from legislation to myths and misinformation.

Russell Nemetz talks about rancher reaction to the definition of meat. Maggie Nutter, a rancher near Sweetgrass, Montana, shares that meat comes from live animals, harvested in the traditional manner.

Jennifer Houston, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association president-elect, says that lab-created meat must be held to similar standards and labeled correctly.

When other products use the term “beef,” they piggyback on the long strides beef has made, and could devalue it.

Weather

Greg Soulje talks weather outlook for the eastern U.S.

Max’s Tractor Shed

Kids love riding tractors. Peg-Perego makes ride-on tractors in the U.S. in both red and green varieties.

 

Segment 5

Max continues talking about new products from the Farm Progress Show. He spoke with Trey Curtis, Concept Agri-Tek, a technology company. The company has hired chemists and agronomists to create new tech in the industry. We make chemistry, we make biology and put them together with agronomic advice to make a customized solution for the farm, says Curtis. The company also emphasizes soil health.

 

Segment 6

FFA Chapter Tribute

The tribute this week goes to Pacheco FFA in Los Banos, Cal. The chapter is building a farm, working at schools and more.

Ray Morones talks about the chapter, which has more than 400 members.

Ag weather forecast

Greg Soulje talks about what weather looks like for the week ahead, and how that will impact the ag sector. The weather should improve as the week goes on.

                                                                                                                           

Segment 7

On Saturday, Dec. 15, some farmer friends will be very busy placing wreaths on military graves at Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery in Illinois and other national cemeteries. Dave Kestel explains how it all comes together, and the roles that local farmers play.

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