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McDonald’s to begin McPlant test at U.S. restaurants

McDonald's McPlant.jpg
Exclusive plant-based patty co-developed with Beyond Meat.

Next month, McDonald’s USA will begin conducting an operations test of the McPlant, a new plant-based burger, for a limited time in eight select restaurants across the U.S.

“We’re always testing new items and flavors, and this particular test will help us understand how offering a burger with a plant-based patty impacts the kitchens in our restaurants,” the company said. “The McPlant was created to give customers more delicious options in addition to the McDonald’s burger line-up you know and love, with fan favorites like the Big Mac and Quarter Pounder sandwich still available nationwide.”

The McPlant includes a plant-based patty co-developed with Beyond Meat that’s exclusive to McDonald’s and made from plant-based ingredients like peas, rice and potatoes. The patty is served on a sesame seed bun with tomato, lettuce, pickles, onions, mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard and a slice of American cheese.

Eight McDonald’s restaurants across the U.S. will be testing the McPlant for a limited time starting Nov. 3, while supplies last. Cities with test locations include Irving and Carrollton, Texas; Cedar Falls, Iowa; Jennings and Lake Charles, Louisiana and El Segundo and Manhattan Beach, California.

The McPlant has also been introduced in various markets overseas this year, including Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Austria and most recently the U.K. Just like in the U.S., the company said it often conducts limited-time offers with menu items internationally to learn.

 

 

TAGS: Business
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