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A Passion for Agriculture

Have you ever thought about the definitive moment in your life that solidified your passion for something? I was asked that question recently about the time in my life when I first found my passion for agriculture. As I think back to my childhood, there is one story that stirred my passions to continue my path in agriculture. Let’s head back to 1994, and I’ll share my tale.

In 1994, my grandpa had a bottle calf. He told me that if I fed that bottle calf every single day and raised it until he was big and strong, he would give me his best replacement heifer in return. I had always wanted my very own heifer, so I took the deal. Everyday after that, I went outside with my bottle of milk and fed my baby calf. Once he was grown and weaned with the rest of the calves, Grandpa gave me my first Limousin heifer, 510C. I named her Breanna.

Breanna later had her first calf, a black bull. His name was Jack, and I was absolutely smitten with him. I was so excited when my dad chose Jack to sell at the Black Hills Stock Show. Everyday after school, I would help my dad work on Jack and another bull, Jake. As an independent little girl, I insisted that I do everything with Jack. I fed him, brushed him, and led him around every night in the barn.

In February, my parents and I made the journey to the Black Hills Stock Show in Rapid City, South Dakota with our bulls, Jack and Jake. I felt like such a grown up kid, skipping school to be in the beef business. I was only seven years old and going to sell my first bull at a real cattle show! I was so proud of Jack, and I couldn’t wait to lead him around in the ring to show him off.

In reality, this was my parents’ business, and I was just the little kid. My determination and independence didn’t understand this concept when my parents told me that they would show Jack in the show and sale, not me. I could only watch as my favorite bull was paraded around the ring.

As Jack was led through the ring during the sale, I could hear the cries from the auction as the bids came in. The ring men raised their hands while the auctioneer sang his song. Finally, Jack sold. My parents were excited, and I was so proud of my bull. Then it hit me: Jack was sold. He wouldn’t be coming home with me in the trailer. He wouldn’t be in the barn to play with when I got home. We wouldn’t run to the fence to sniff my hand or lick my coat. Jack would leave with a stranger from Wyoming, and I would never see him again.

As we said goodbye to Jack before leaving our adventure at the Black Hills Stock Show, I cried and gave my friend a big hug around his neck. The lesson I learned that day was that agriculture isn’t for the weak hearted. The beef business takes sacrifice, dedication, hard work and most importantly, passion.

I truly realized my passion for the beef industry that day. Since that sad day in 1994, I have sold my fair share of bulls. I have learned that agriculture is a business, a way to make a living off the land. However, passion should be the driving force in anything we choose to do, and I'm sure that's why most of you are still in this business. What better job can we have than to feed our world's people? So how about you? When did you decide you loved the beef business?

God Bless Farmers and Ranchers!

Beef

Oswego Stock Farm Recognized as Golden Hereford Breeder

KANSAS CITY, Mo. ­­­— In celebration of 50 years in the Hereford business, Marv and Ruth Espenscheid, owners of Oswego Stock Farm, were honored as Golden Breeders on Nov. 4. Jack Ward, American Hereford Association chief operating officer and director of breed improvement, presented the award to Marv and Ruth during the Association’s Annual Meeting in Kansas City, Mo. Oswego Stock Farm is a seedstock Hereford operation near Argyle, Wis.

The American Hereford Association, with headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., is one of the largest U.S. beef breed associations. The not-for-profit organization along with its subsidiaries — Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC, Hereford Publications Inc. (HPI) and American Beef Records Association (ABRA) — provides programs and services for its members and their customers, while promoting the Hereford breed and supporting education, youth and research. For more information about the Association, visit Hereford.org.

For pictures and additional news releases, visit www.herefordphotoshop.com/media. Enter “Hereford08” when prompted for a password.

Cutline: Golden Breeder

Marv and Ruth Espenscheid, owners of Oswego Stock Farm, Argyle, Wis., were honored as Golden Hereford Breeders on Nov. 4 during the American Hereford Association’s Annual Meeting in Kansas City, Mo.

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Amy Cowan

American Hereford Association

Marketing and National Shows

1501 Wyandotte

Kansas City, MO 64108

phone (816) 842-3757

fax (816) 842-6931

www.hereford.org

Herefords...The Efficiency Experts

Beef

Help prevent calf scours by building the best antibody-rich colostrum possible

Greensboro, NC (November 7, 2008) – A big issue for beef producers last winter was calf scours, and this year likely will be no different. Producers can help prevent the problem by vaccinating pregnant cows and heifers with a scours prevention vaccine in order to build high-quality colostrum.

How do you build the best antibody-rich colostrum possible? Timing is key.

“Cows need to build antibodies in their blood before laying them down in colostrum,” says Doug Scholz, DVM, director of veterinary services for Novartis Animal Health. “Antibodies move from blood to colostrum four to six weeks before calving.”

To maximize antibodies before they are transferred to the colostrum, it’s important to not only give the vaccine prior to that window, but also to select a product that provides sustained antibody levels through calving.

Chris Chase, DVM, PhD, professor of veterinary science at South Dakota State University, explains: “In cattle, immunoglobulins are not transported across the placenta, so colostral immunoglobulins are critically important. Oil adjuvants in a vaccine help provide sustained immunoglobulin levels in cows.”

With Scour Bos® 9, you can vaccinate earlier than you can with any other product.

Scholz adds: “You can make sure circulating antibodies are as high as possible before they are transferred to the colostrum, and you can vaccinate an animal that is less immunosuppressed compared to one that is about to calve.”

The Scour Bos® label indicates that the first year, you vaccinate with Scour Bos® 9 at eight to 16 weeks pre-calving and follow up with a booster dose of Scour Bos® 4 at four weeks pre-calving. The second year and thereafter, it’s just one dose of Scour Bos® 9 eight to 10 weeks pre-calving.

For beef producers, this timing often coincides with preg-check, which is convenient and cost-effective.

“As we like to say, ‘preg-check and protect,’” says Scholz.

In addition to timing, using the right vaccine is important in preventing scours.

Because scours is often multifactoral, Scour Bos® 9 provides broad spectrum protection with nine antigens, including three rotaviruses – in fact, it’s the only three-way rotavirus vaccine on the market.

When calves are born, they should ingest at least four quarts of antibody-bolstered colostrum within six hours of birth. Delivering antibody-rich colostrum at this time is important because a calf is born with its immune system suppressed.

To find out more about preventing calf scours, visit www.livestock.novartis.com or ask your veterinarian.

About Novartis Animal Health

Novartis Animal Health researches, develops and commercializes leading animal treatments that meet the needs of pet owners, farmers and veterinarians. Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Novartis Animal Health conducts business in 40 countries and employs about 2,700 people worldwide. For more information, please consult www.ah.novartis.us.

About Novartis

Novartis AG provides healthcare solutions that address the evolving needs of patients and societies. Focused solely on healthcare, Novartis offers a diversified portfolio to best meet these needs: innovative medicines, cost-saving generic pharmaceuticals, preventive vaccines, diagnostic tools and consumer health products. Novartis is the only company with leading positions in these areas. In 2007, the Group’s continuing operations (excluding divestments in 2007) achieved net sales of USD 38.1 billion and net income of USD 6.5 billion. Approximately USD 6.4 billion was invested in R&D activities throughout the Group. Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Novartis Group companies employ approximately 97,000 full-time associates and operate in over 140 countries around the world. For more information, please visit www.novartis.com.

# # #

Novartis Animal Health Media Relations

Joseph Burkett

Novartis Animal Health Communications(336) 387-1006 (direct)(336) 209-4887 (mobile)[email protected] GroceNovartis Animal Health Communications(336) 387-1080 (direct)(336) 601-8079 (mobile)[email protected]

Scour Bos is a registered trademark of Novartis AG. For further information, contact Novartis Animal Health US, Inc., Customer Relations Department, 3200 Northline Avenue, Ste. 300, Greensboro, NC 27408; 1-800-843-3386.

© 2008 Novartis Animal Health US, Inc.

Beef

Buchholz Named AHW Woman of the Year

KANSAS CITY, Mo. ­­­— Kathy Knox Buchholz of Bardwell, Texas, has been named the 2008 American Hereford Women (AHW) Woman of the Year. She was honored at the AHW Annual Meeting in Kansas City on Nov. 1.

Kathy and her husband, Gary, are partners in GKB cattle, a seedstock enterprise, and Hereford is their breed of choice.

Kathy grew up in the Hereford business; she is the daughter of George W. “Tee” Knox and the late Jo Gregory Knox. Hereford steer and heifer shows were Kathy’s passion; she excelled in the showring.

Following in her mother’s footsteps, Kathy has devoted time to serve on the board of the American Hereford Auxiliary. Kathy was involved in the creation of the AHW and was a founding director. Likewise, Jo Knox was recognized as the Outstanding Hereford Woman in 1985, 23 years prior to her daughter’s receiving the same recognition.

Kathy has always been a member and supporter of the Texas Hereford Association and Texas Auxiliary. She is one of only three women to have been elected to the Texas Hereford Association executive committee.

Generous with her time and money, Kathy is a tireless supporter of youth and Herefords. She has judged numerous cattle shows, sponsors public speaking awards and presents a buckle each year to the retiring president of the Texas Junior Hereford Association (TJHA) in memory of her mother. She and Gary were a part of the steering committee to combine the TJHA and Texas Junior Polled Hereford Association state shows into one fantastic extravaganza and continue to guide its success today.

“Kathy is a deserving recipient of this award, given the broad range of her exemplary leadership and support of the beef industry, women, youth and, most of all, her beloved Hereford cattle,” says Susan Turner, retired AHW director.

Past Hereford Woman of the Year award recipient Lyn Chastain adds, “Her tiny size 6 boots have left giant footprints for excellence and professionalism and kicked enormous holes in the glass ceiling for women in agriculture.”

Although her parents suggested she attend one of their colleges and choose an alternative career path, Kathy was determined to wear a Texas A&M senior ring and major in agriculture. At the time, A&M was mostly male, and professors were not overly receptive to women students. By the time she graduated with two degrees, she had been a member of both the livestock and meats teams and had professors looking forward to having more qualified women in their classes. She was also an extremely active member and officer of the Saddle & Sirloin Club.

While attending stock shows and marketing Hereford cattle raised on her family’s ranch, Kathy met and married Gary. During the late 1980s and early ’90s her focus was on Buchholz Bros. Shorthorns, but that did not change her allegiance to Herefords.

She has been involved with both breeds and served as a national advisor to both junior organizations.

“Meticulous, precise and detailed, Kathy is the record keeper for the operation,” Turner says. “She is known affectionately as a ‘showbox lawyer’ because she has read all the rules and has all the answers.”

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For pictures and additional news releases, visit www.herefordphotoshop.com/media. Enter “Hereford08” when prompted for a password.

Cutline: AHW Woman of the Year

Kathy Buchholz., center, is the 2008 American Hereford Women (AHW) Woman of the Year. Pictured presenting the award are Janelle Bischoff, AHW historian, and Susan Turner, retired AHW board member.

Amy Cowan

American Hereford Association

Marketing and National Shows

1501 Wyandotte

Kansas City, MO 64108

phone (816) 842-3757

fax (816) 842-6931

www.hereford.org

Herefords...The Efficiency Experts

Beef

NALF Annual Meeting to Join National Limousin Show, Sale at NWSS

North American Limousin Foundation (NALF) members and Limousin admirers from around the world will gather at the National Western Stock Show (NWSS), Jan. 11–14, 2009, in Denver, Colo. NALF is planning several events for those attending its annual meeting and national show and sale.

The first class of animals in the juniors’ female show will enter the ring at 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 11, for Jeff Sargent of Denison, Texas, to judge. The National Limousin Sale Parade will begin at 3 p.m.

The action will shift to the Doubletree Hotel Denver at 6 p.m. for the NALF member social, where the association will conclude its yearlong 40th-anniversary celebration by recognizing its past presidents. The annual “Genetics on Ice” auction to benefit the North American Limousin Junior Association (NALJA) and the All-American Limousin Futurity (AALF) will follow the social.

“Genetics on Ice” will open with the third annual Corner Post Genetics Package. Deer Valley Farm of Fayetteville, Tenn., has donated the headline flush of 10 embryos, with five guaranteed pregnancies. The buyer will be able to choose one of five elite Angus donor cows the farm is offering to flush to any available Limousin or Lim-Flex® artificial-insemination (AI) sire.

The NALF annual meeting will begin at 9 a.m. Monday, Jan. 12, at the hotel. President Bob Millerberg of Draper, Utah, will preside as members conduct the association’s business, including the election of five directors. As part of the annual meeting, NALF staff members will offer various breakout sessions.

The National Limousin Sale starts at 6 p.m. Monday. The sale catalog will be available via the NALF home page (www.nalf.org) in late December.

The Medal of Excellence (MOE) Lim-Flex and Limousin shows begin at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 13. Jack Ward of Plattsburg, Mo., will judge those entries.

The Limousin and Lim-Flex pen-of-bulls shows will open at 8 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15. Mark McCully, Wooster, Ohio; Jimmy Linthicum, Welch, Okla.; and Brian Price, Garden City, Kan., will officiate.

NALF then will conduct its third annual Lim-Flex female pen show and sale. Complete rules for those events are in the “Programs” section of the NALF Web site.

The Limousin carload-of-bulls show will conclude Wednesday’s events.

NALF will name its Limousin Commercial Producer of the Year, Limousin Commercial Marketing Booster of the Year and Limousin Promoter of the Year throughout the day. Magness Land and Cattle, Platteville, Colo., and Wulf Limousin Farms, Morris, Minn., will sponsor a complimentary lunch to begin at noon for NALF members and guests.

The Doubletree Hotel Denver at 3203 Quebec St. will serve as the breed’s official headquarters hotel during the NWSS. Call 1-800-222-8733 to make reservations there.

The North American Limousin Foundation (www.nalf.org), headquartered in Centennial, Colo., provides programs and services – including genetic evaluation of 5,000 active sires – to more than 4,000 members and their commercial customers. The Limousin breed and its Lim-Flex® hybrid lead the beef industry in muscle-growth efficiency and ideally complement British breeds.

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A complete schedule of Limousin events

is in the attached rich-text format (RTF) document.

Contact Brad Parker

[email protected]

Beef

Larry Cundiff Honored with Hereford Hall of Merit Award

KANSAS CITY, Mo. ­­­— Larry Cundiff, Clay Center, Neb., was honored with the Hereford Hall of Merit Award Nov. 3, 2008, in Kansas City during the American Hereford Association (AHA) Annual Meeting. Hall of Merit inductees aren’t necessarily Hereford breeders but have, in their own ways, greatly influenced the Hereford breed and cattle industry.

Larry Cundiff has conducted genetic and breeding research that has contributed to significant changes in breeding systems and genetic improvement programs used in U.S. beef production. He directed a project that demonstrated the benefits of heterosis from systematic crossing of Herefords, Angus and Shorthorns increased output per cow about 23%. These results contributed significantly to widespread use of crossbred cows in U.S. beef herds.

For more than thirty years, he served as leader of a Germplasm Evaluation Program in which 36 breeds of cattle were characterized for a comprehensive series of traits of importance in beef production.

Cundiff has served as chairman of the BIF committee on genetic prediction and as the ARS, USDA representative on the BIF board of directors. He has received the BIF Service Award and BIF Pioneer Award, American Society of Animal Science Animal Breeding Award and Fellow Award, USDA-ARS Northern Plains Area Outstanding Scientist of the Year Award, USDA Superior Service Award and the American Polled Hereford Association Hall of Merit Award. Cundiff was recognized by BEEF magazine in 1989 as part of “25 who made a difference” and in 2004 as part of the “top 40” for contributions to the beef industry.

AHA Director of Breed Improvement and Chief Operating Officer Jack Ward says, “Dr. Cundiff’s work has allowed us to compare EPDs (expected progeny differences) across breeds and has shown the effects of crossbreeding. Also, the AHA used his work to help in the development of the $indexes. He has been and continues to be a true friend of the beef industry.”

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The American Hereford Association, with headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., is one of the largest U.S. beef breed associations. The not-for-profit organization along with its subsidiaries — Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC, Hereford Publications Inc. (HPI) and American Beef Records Association (ABRA) — provides programs and services for its members and their customers, while promoting the Hereford breed and supporting education, youth and research. For more information about the Association, visit Hereford.org.

For pictures and additional news releases, visit www.herefordphotoshop.com/media. Enter “Hereford08” when prompted for a password.

Amy Cowan

American Hereford Association

Marketing and National Shows

1501 Wyandotte

Kansas City, MO 64108

phone (816) 842-3757

fax (816) 842-6931

www.hereford.org

Herefords...The Efficiency Experts

>
Beef

Jon Beever Honored with Hereford Hall of Merit Award

KANSAS CITY, Mo. ­­­— Jon Beever, Urbana, Ill., was honored with the Hereford Hall of Merit Award Nov. 3, 2008, in Kansas City during the American Hereford Association (AHA) Annual Meeting.

Hall of Merit inductees aren’t necessarily Hereford breeders but have, in their own ways, greatly influenced the Hereford breed and cattle industry.

Jon Beever has been working with the AHA for three years as a geneticist researching genetic abnormalities. In 2008 Beever established a test for idiopathic epilepsy (IE), a genetic defect in Hereford cattle after years of studying the patterns of inheritance and then isolating the actual recessive gene that causes the condition.

Beever is a molecular geneticist and associate professor at the University of Illinois. He earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Illinois in 1986, 1989 and 1996, respectively, all in animal sciences. After earning his doctorate, he remained at the University of Illinois as a professor and researcher. His research emphasis has been on identifying genetic markers in animals, mostly cattle and swine, for diseases as well as economically important traits.

In addition to discovering the genetic defect IE for the AHA, Beever worked to identify and develop a test to screen for the molecular defect causing Spider Lamb Syndrome in sheep and the genetic defect causing Tibial Hemimelia in bovines, among others. He is currently working on identifying the genetic defect called “Curly Calf Syndrome” for the American Angus Association.

Beever’s dedication to helping the AHA and the beef industry deal with genetic abnormalities is much appreciated by AHA staff and cattlemen everywhere. AHA Director of Breed Improvement and Chief Operating Officer Jack Ward says, “His expertise in the area of molecular genetics has changed attitudes of cattlemen throughout the industry and has allowed breeders to make genetic improvement without the worries of incorporating genetic issues.”

Beever and his wife Stephanie live near Urbana, Ill. They have three children: Erin, 11; Taylor, 17; and Zachary, 19.

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The American Hereford Association, with headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., is one of the largest U.S. beef breed associations. The not-for-profit organization along with its subsidiaries — Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC, Hereford Publications Inc. (HPI) and American Beef Records Association (ABRA) — provides programs and services for its members and their customers, while promoting the Hereford breed and supporting education, youth and research. For more information about the Association, visit Hereford.org.

For pictures and additional news releases, visit www.herefordphotoshop.com/media. Enter “media” when prompted for a password.

Amy Cowan

American Hereford Association

Marketing and National Shows

1501 Wyandotte

Kansas City, MO 64108

phone (816) 842-3757

fax (816) 842-6931

www.hereford.org

Herefords...The Efficiency Experts

Beef

Doug Bennett Inducted into Hereford Hall of Fame

KANSAS CITY, Mo. ­­­— Doug Bennett, Echo, Ore., was inducted into the Hereford Hall of Fame Nov. 3, 2008, in Kansas City during the American Hereford Association (AHA) Annual Meeting.

Doug has been a Hereford breeder for more than 40 years. He graduated from Washington State College and began working in the Hereford business as a manager.

Then in 1976 after managing Stone Hereford Ranch through its dispersal, Doug and his brother Don purchased Stone Hereford Ranch and developed it into Oregon Hereford Ranch.

In 1979 Doug partnered with Sam Friedman to develop Lone Star Hereford Ranch. After nearly 20 years of running that ranch, he returned to Oregon Hereford Ranch in 1998 where he started a backgrounding operation. Then last March, Doug began selling part of his Hereford herd and says he is now “semi-retired.”

Doug has also served in various leadership roles. He has been on the AHA Board, president and director of the Oregon, Washington, N. Idaho Hereford Association (OWNI), president of the Breed Improvement Federation (BIF) and as executive committee member of the Texas Hereford Association.

Jack Evans, EE Ranches, Winona, Miss., says of Doug, “Whether managing the cow herd, feeding, fitting and showing Denver champions, or handling merchandising and production sales, Doug Bennett is one of our greatest all-around cattlemen.”

Doug and his wife Gladys have four children: Doug Jr., Susan, Randy and Mitch; 12 grandchildren; one great-grandchild and three more on the way.

The American Hereford Association, with headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., is one of the largest U.S. beef breed associations. The not-for-profit organization along with its subsidiaries — Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC, Hereford Publications Inc. (HPI) and American Beef Records Association (ABRA) — provides programs and services for its members and their customers, while promoting the Hereford breed and supporting education, youth and research. For more information about the Association, visit Hereford.org.

For pictures and additional news releases, visit www.herefordphotoshop.com/media. Enter “Hereford08” when prompted for a password.

Photo Cutline:

Doug Bennett, Echo, Ore., was inducted into the Hereford Hall of Fame on Nov. 3. Pictured at the award presentation (l to r) are: Bill King, 2009 AHA president; Doug and Gladys Bennett and Susan and Joe Parks, Nash, Okla.

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Amy Cowan

American Hereford Association

Marketing and National Shows

1501 Wyandotte

Kansas City, MO 64108

phone (816) 842-3757

fax (816) 842-6931

www.hereford.org

Herefords...The Efficiency Experts

Beef

Pat Wilson inducted to Hereford Hall of Fame

KANSAS CITY, Mo. ­­­— Pat Wilson was posthumously inducted into the Hereford Hall of Fame Nov. 3, 2008, in Kansas City during the American Hereford Association (AHA) Annual Meeting.

Pat Wilson, formerly of Frostproof, Fla., started his Hereford seedstock operation, Crooked Lake Ranch, in the 1960s and continued to produce top-quality cattle there until his death Oct. 14, 2008.

Pat was a firm believer in performance testing, and used his commercial cattle operation to evaluate his seedstock breeding program.

Pat and his wife, Patricia, were honored in 1973 with the Beef Improvement Federation’s (BIF) Commercial Producer of the Year Award, just the second producer ever to be honored with that recognition.

Thomas “Fred” Stokes observes that, “The Crooked Lake herd consistently achieves exceptional performance on grass alone in the inhospitable climate of central Florida.”

Pat also dedicated time to serving the industry by supporting state and national Hereford associations, as well as county, state and national beef associations.

Mark Cooper of Cooper Hereford Ranch, Willow Creek, Mont., says, “Pat has been a good friend and inspiration to me and many other livestock producers across America, and he has been a very influential voice for the American producer.”

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The American Hereford Association, with headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., is one of the largest U.S. beef breed associations. The not-for-profit organization along with its subsidiaries — Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC, Hereford Publications Inc. (HPI) and American Beef Records Association (ABRA) — provides programs and services for its members and their customers, while promoting the Hereford breed and supporting education, youth and research. For more information about the Association, visit Hereford.org.

For pictures and additional news releases, visit www.herefordphotoshop.com/media. Enter “Hereford08” when prompted for a password.

Photo Cutline:

Pat Wilson was posthumously inducted into the Hereford Hall of Fame Nov. 3. Pictured at the award presentation (front row, l to r) are: Bill King, 2009 AHA president; Jinx Chaney, Biloxi, Miss.; Max Henry and Patricia Wilson, Lake Wales, Fla.; Coot Wilson, Frostproof, Fla.; and Wil Blaylock, Cullman, Ala. Back row (l to r) are: Clay and Heather Wilson, Lake Wales, Fla.; Wilson and Missy Blaylock and Chesley and Claire Peyton Bowman, Cullman, Ala.; Charlie, Cindy and Seddon Henry, Lake Wales, Fla.; and Mary Ruth, Caleb and Jacob Wilson, Frostproof, Fla.

Amy Cowan

American Hereford Association

Marketing and National Shows

1501 Wyandotte

Kansas City, MO 64108

phone (816) 842-3757

fax (816) 842-6931

www.hereford.org

Herefords...The Efficiency Experts

Beef

American Angus Association Seeks Summer Interns

The American Angus Association® is now accepting applications from college students who want to explore a career and gain real-world experience at a breed association. The paid internships last approximately 10-12 weeks during Summer 2009. Application deadline is February 1, 2009.

The Association’s communications department offers an internship to junior or senior-level students majoring in agricultural journalism or communications who have an interest in the livestock industry. Animal science students with a strong skill set in writing and editing are also encouraged to apply.

Students interested in the communications internship should have completed course work in news and feature writing, as well as editing and photography. The candidate should have experience with livestock shows. Send a cover letter, resume and writing samples to Shelia Stannard, director of communications & events.

The junior activities department employs a college student to assist the planning and execution of junior Angus shows and leadership events. The intern will work closely with various aspects of event planning. Applicants should be detail-oriented, outgoing, be able to work with all types of people and be a self-starter.

Applicants for the junior activities internship should be incoming juniors or seniors with an agriculture-related major. Any student interested should apply to Robin Ruff, director of junior activities.

For more information about any of these internships, or to submit application, which includes cover letter, resume and references, please contact the individuals listed above at 3201 Frederick Ave., Saint Joseph, MO 64506 or call them at 816-383-5100. Applicants for the communications internship should also submit writing and photography samples. Students interested in multiple internships should apply to each individual.

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© Copyright 2008, All rights reserved.

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American Angus Association®

3201 Frederick Ave.

St. Joseph, MO 64506 Contact us:

phone 816.383.5100

fax 816.233.9703

e-mail [email protected]