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Articles from 2019 In November


This Week in Agribusiness – Nov. 30, 2019

Note: Start the video and all parts will play through as the full show

Part 1

Mike Pearson and Chad Colby open this week’s show talking about the unstable weather ahead from Greg Soulje, which is not good news. Patrick Haggerty talks with Collin Peterson, D-Minn., and chair of the House Ag Committee, about the uncertainty of the trade situation. Max Armstrong talks with Colin Woodall, CEO, National Cattlemens Beef Association, about some trade wins that have occurred this year. Mike and Chad get an update on the land market with Ray Brownfield, Land Pro LLC.

Part 2

Mike Pearson and Chad Colby continue their conversation with Ray Brownfield, Land Pro LLC, including a look at land rents. In Colby AgTech, Chad shares some interesting gift ideas for the holiday season.

Part 3

Mike Pearson and Chad Colby talk with Farm Broadcaster Don Wick, Red River Ag Network, Grand Forks, N.D., about what farmers are facing in that part of the country, including lost crops of potatoes and sugar beets. Max Armstrong shares the story of an 875-hp tractor that showed up at the Half Century of Progress event last summer. Max talks with Lee Randall owner of the Rite Earthquake tractor, including some history about the tractor.

Part 4

Mike Pearson and Chad Colby open this segment with a look at the controversy occurring in the renewable fuels community and Max Armstrong talks with Geoff Cooper, Renewable Fuels Assocation about the situation. In a Best of the Farm Progress Show, Max talks with Jim Hedges, vice president, seed marketing, Winfield United about the cooperative and the work they're doinig. Ag Meteorologist Greg Soulje offers a first-look at weather for the week ahead.

Part 5

Ag Meteorologist Greg Soulje looks at the long-range weather forecast for agriculture including some major challenges in December.

Part 6

In Max’s Tractor Shed, Max Armstrong shares the story of a International Harvester Hydro 86 owned by Harry Knobbe, West Point, Neb. Max shared that earlier this year Harry had an accident, but he is working to recover, including getting back behind the wheel of this legacy tractor. Max Armstrong profiles Chillicothe FFA in Chillicothe, Mo. Member Abby Hayen shares insight on a couple community activities. Max also shares that the chapter is supported by the Litton Foundation, and Member Clara Leamer, shares more information about the support of the Litton Ag Center. And Member Delaney May shares how the center helps members who show livestock, including for those who live in town.

Part 7

Mike Pearson and Chad Colby close this week’s show talking turkeys, specifically Max Armstrong's report on the 2019 White House turkeys that came from the Clinton, N.C. turkey farm owned by Wellie Jackson. Of course "Bread" and "Butter" are a little different; they've been media trained. And Chad and Mike recognized Steve Bridge who was honored with the Doane Award for his report from China last year; and you can see a montage of that coverage.

MIDDAY-Midwest Digest, November 29, 2019

Max Armstrong wraps up the week with news of the big storm headed to the Northern Plains, which will bring snow to a wide region. A Missouri tattoo artist, Justin Fleetwood, started covering racist tattoos at no charge, which is keeping him very busy. From This Week in Agribusiness, there will be a wide number of meetings starting in December, and Max will be attending many of those including the Farm Futures Business Summit. And Max warns of the items you can't take on a plane in your carry on luggage, including such things as tools, and homemade jam.

Midwest Digest is a twice-daily audio feature produced by Max Armstrong, offering news and commentary from across the Midwest.

And don’t miss Farm Progress America, which runs every day online.

MORNING-Midwest Digest, November 29, 2019

Max Armstrong shares news that a safari park in Ohio was hit by fire that killed some animals. In Brownsburg, Ind., police are looking into the murder of a popular orthopedic surgeon. From This Week in Agribusiness, the difficult harvest drags on as Max shares what he's seen on social media; and there's more wet weather ahead. Max shares the story of a radio station tower that was hit by high winds in Louisville, Ky. And could Black Friday kill you?

Midwest Digest is a twice-daily audio feature produced by Max Armstrong, offering news and commentary from across the Midwest.

And don’t miss Farm Progress America, which runs every day online.

Photo: Sarah Silbiger/stringer/Getty Images News

Farm Progress America, November 29, 2019

Max Armstrong shares that talk of 'sustainability' isn't always in the same language. Max shares insight from the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance survey that showed that there are a lot of tools that are not harmonized. Erin Fitzgerald, CEO, offers tactics that has to happen to get everyone closer to the same page.

Farm Progress America is a daily look at key issues in agriculture. It is produced and presented by Max Armstrong, veteran farm broadcaster and host of This Week in Agribusiness.

Photo: Stanley45/iStock/Getty Images Plus

MIDDAY-Midwest Digest, November 28, 2019

Max Armstrong shares that folks in northeast Ohio are thankful after an 88-year-old veteran saved a child being mauled by a pit bull. Leonard Miller used a yard Christmas decoration to beat the dog off the child. Max also shares the story of neighbors in Indiana who came together to mourn the loss of a young man in a grain accident. The farmers in the region brought their equipment and lined it up along a road in honor of the young man – Colten Lee Howard. From trucks to sprayers to combines to tractors, tens of millions of dollars of equipment were lined up.

Midwest Digest is a twice-daily audio feature produced by Max Armstrong, offering news and commentary from across the Midwest.

And don’t miss Farm Progress America, which runs every day online.

MORNING-Midwest Digest, November 28, 2019

Max Armstrong offers his Thanksgiving Day edition of Midwest Digest with a story about Leonard Miller, 88, who saved a child being mauled by a pit bull, with the help of a holiday nutcracker poll. Miller is a combat veteran who served in the Korean War. From This Week in Agribusiness, even in times of heated neighborly competition, farmers still come together. This time it was for a funeral Wednesday for an 18-year-old killed in a farm accident. In Park County, Indiana, farmers lined up their equipment in tribute to the young man, Colten Lee Howard, killed in a grain bin accident.

Midwest Digest is a twice-daily audio feature produced by Max Armstrong, offering news and commentary from across the Midwest.

And don’t miss Farm Progress America, which runs every day online.

Farm Progress America, November 28, 2019

Max Armstrong offers news that the week of Thanksgiving has traditionally been National Farm-City Week, a celebration that has dwindled in attention. Max shares some of the thinking behind the concept the celebration with comments from a presidential proclamation in 2010 from President Obama.

Farm Progress America is a daily look at key issues in agriculture. It is produced and presented by Max Armstrong, veteran farm broadcaster and host of This Week in Agribusiness.

Photo: SuzanaMarinkovic/iStock/Getty Images Plus

MIDDAY-Midwest Digest, November 27, 2019

Max Armstrong talks weather with a high-wind, snow filled storm tracking across the country. He shares that there's a new list of states that people are leaving including Illinois, Kansas, Ohio, Kentucky and Wisconsin. From This Week in Agribusiness, high hopes for the biggest hemp auction in Tennessee that was to help farmers get a great price, but prices simply fell during bidding. And there are the food safety recalls including romaine lettuce from California.

Midwest Digest is a twice-daily audio feature produced by Max Armstrong, offering news and commentary from across the Midwest.

And don’t miss Farm Progress America, which runs every day online.

Physician tells patients to eat beef & be merry

Beef Checkoff dijon-beef-rolls-horizonta copy.png

I recently read an op-ed featured in Forbes that gives me hope that common sense and truth may one day prevail. And when that truth does finally shine through, nobody will need to feel guilty about eating meat.

The op-ed was written by Paul Hsieh, a physician with expertise in health policy, medical ethics and free market economics. Hsieh is also the founder of Freedom and Individual Rights in Medicine (FIRM) and practices medicine in Denver, Colo.

Titled, “I’m a physician, and I’ll continue eating read meat,” Hsieh shares why the past and current recommendations to reduce red meat consumption in favor of a plant-centered diet is based on faulty science and grand assumptions.

Addressing the recent study printed in the Annals of Internal Medicine, which concluded that adults should, “continue current levels of red meat and processed meat consumption.”

Hsieh writes, “These conclusions were a direct challenge to current recommendations urging that people significantly reduce red meat consumption. These new recommendations have met with ‘fierce criticism’ from the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In particular, the Harvard group called these new recommendations “irresponsible and unethical” and warned that this could ‘harm the credibility of nutrition science and erode public trust in scientific research.’”

The 14 researchers who conducted this study found that most of the plant-based data is derived from weak observational studies.

Hsieh explains why this type of research can be so flimsy. He says, “Observational studies are notoriously unreliable, in part because they are based on people’s reported recollections of what they ate — sometimes weeks in the past. I sometimes have a hard time remembering what I had for dinner the night before, let alone 3 weeks ago!

“Another problem with observational studies is the issue of confounding factors. We must be careful not to confuse correlation with causation.”

The good doctor goes onto explain that he recommends his clients continue to eat and enjoy meat for their health, and he practices what he preaches in his own life, as well.

He concludes, “As for myself, I’ll continue eating red meat at my current levels, purchasing meat from sources in accordance with my ethical values. Enjoying some hearty beef stew at dinner or crispy bacon at breakfast probably won’t affect my health much one way or another. But it will certainly enhance my overall life and happiness!”

So this holiday season and every day after, eat meat and be merry! It’s good for you, for your health and for the planet, too. Despite what the populace would tell us otherwise, the facts and the science are on our side; it’s just been swept under the rug for the last 40 years.

Thank you, Dr. Hsieh, for being willing to stick your neck out and share an unpopular truth. We appreciate your experience, wisdom and expertise in this arena!

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Farm Progress.

Oh, what a year it's been for beef producers

Winter hay

2019 was great year for much of America’s midsection. If you’re a duck.

That’s how I started a blog last September after traveling from Grand Island, Neb. to Bismarck, N.D. The amount of ruined hay, much of which was in round bales still in the field and sitting in several feet of water, was staggering.

The ducks, it seems, are still coming out ahead.

At this Thanksgiving season, we have much to be thankful for in the beef business. Family, friends, faith and the opportunity to make a living are just a few of the many things we have to be thankful for.

READ: Getting cow nutrition right from the start

But the reality is that this was a tough year for beef producers. Those of you in the middle of the volatility and weather extremes already know that. As I write this, I look out the window at 14 inches of snow and the storm headed for the part of cow country that needs it the least.

In a tough year, it’s essential to trim overhead. There’s much to be said for the financial benefits of roughing a cow through the winter. But research on fetal programming now shows us that such a management program can have negative effects on the calf. If it’s a heifer you keep for replacement, it can even affect her calf.

A common winter management approach is to rough the cows along until late in the pregnancy, then feed them up so they’re in good body condition at calving. It may be time to rethink that.

That’s because research shows that much of the important fetal development occurs in the first and second semester of pregnancy. Organ, muscle and immune function development all occur then. Restricting nutrition to the cow restricts nutrition to the fetus, which restricts the calf’s ability to fully express its genetic potential in these areas.

Beef Roundtable: Fetal programming: Fact or fiction?

So there’s one area where it might pay to spend a little money this winter. And that’s testing your hay and feeding more supplement if necessary.

Bottom line—there’s a lot of rained-on hay around. For those dealing with that, there are no good options. Feeding it won’t provide the nutrition that cattle need to get through the winter. Buying and trucking hay is expensive.

On the plus side, winter grazing should be good. But with all the rain, the grass is likely washy and will probably have less protein than average. So will any late-baled, more mature hay.

Read: Fetal programming studies show supplemtation pays

Either way, knowing what you’ve got from a nutritional perspective matters. As we know, cows in less-than-adequate body condition will have a harder time squeaking through winter, won’t be able to produce adequate colostrum and will produce a calf that has two strikes against it before its ever born.

Let’s hope the weather of 2019 is behind us. But perhaps it’s wise to be prepared to help your cows winter another hard one.