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Articles from 2017 In April


Your old work jeans could be worth $425!

Nordstroms Nordstroms Muddy Jeans

Last week, Nordstroms unveiled its newest trend in fashion — fake mud jeans. The “Barracuda Straight Legs Jeans” feature a faux caked-on mud look for the man who wants to look rugged and tough without actually having to do any physical labor. These jeans retail for a whopping $425, and apparently, they are going to be the hot ticket item for the summer.

According to Nordstrom’s description of the jeans, “These heavily distressed medium-blue denim jeans embody rugged, Americana workwear that's seen some hard-working action with a crackled, caked-on muddy coating that shows you're not afraid to get down and dirty.”

Mike Rowe, TV personality from the show Dirty Jobs, probably said it best when he wrote, “Our country’s war on work continues to rage in all corners of polite society. Behold the latest assault from Nordstrom’s. The “Barracuda Straight Leg Jeans.” They seem to value icons of work. What they don’t value - obviously - is authenticity.

“Forget the jeans themselves for a moment, and their price, and look again at the actual description. ‘Rugged Americana’ is now synonymous with a ‘caked-on, muddy coating.’ Not real mud. Fake mud. Something to foster the illusion of work. The illusion of effort. Or perhaps, for those who actually buy them, the illusion of sanity. The Barracuda Straight Leg Jeans aren’t pants. They’re not even fashion. They’re a costume for wealthy people who see work as ironic – not iconic.”

Perhaps we should see this imitation as a form of flattery. After all, you can go to any country music concert in America this summer and see guys and gals in plaid shirts, faded blue jeans, knock-off cowboy boots and straw hats.

For decades, the entire world has been in love with the classic Americana cowboy and the wild, rugged life he leads. However, today’s society is so far removed from the actual work, sacrifice and risk of the blue collar class that they forget their food doesn’t come from a grocery store, and their bonfire kindling, cotton t-shirts and leather jackets don’t originate from a shop in town.

Yet, this trend in work jeans tells me that our consumers want to reconnect with their roots and heritage. After all, they are willing to pay big bucks to look just like we do after a hard day of work!

Over the years, I’ve spent countless hours and gallons of Dawn dish soap cleaning mud, grease, oil and manure stains out of our work jeans. Perhaps we should undercut the competition and open up shop for authentic, worked in, well loved, vintage, distressed blue jeans that come with a history and a story to regale to your friends at the next backyard barbecue.

What do you think about this new trend in blue jeans? Can you believe folks are actually paying $425 for faux mud jeans? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

The opinions of Amanda Radke are not necessarily those of beefmagazine.com or Penton Agriculture.

How many are still operating?


Orion Samuelson wonders if any single-room schoolhouses are still operating.

Samuelson Sez is a special feature of This Week in Agribusiness where Orion Samuelson shares his thoughts and insights into key issues of the day.

Chapter Tribute: Naperville Central FFA

Max Armstrong profiles Naperville Central FFA, Naperville, Illinois, this 25-member chapter was originally formed in 1938. Chapter member Emily Dziegimiski talks about how their group tries to raise awareness of ag in their urban community.

The weekly FFA Chapter Tribute is an opportunity to shine a spotlight on the good work of your local chapter. Tell us about what you're doing, give us some history from your group and tell our viewers of the work you do in the community. FFA chapters across the country deserve recognition for the work they do, make sure we include yours.

To have your chapter considered for this weekly feature, send along information about your group by e-mail to Orion Samuelson at [email protected] or to Max Armstrong at [email protected]. They'll get your group on the list of those that will be covered in the future. It's a chance to share your story beyond the local community. Drop Orion or Max a "line" soon.

The National FFA Organization, formerly known as Future Farmers of America, is a national youth organization of about 650,000 student members as part of 7,757 local FFA chapters. The National FFA Organization remains committed to the individual student, providing a path to achievement in premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. For more, visit the National FFA Organization online www.ffa.org, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nationalffa, on Twitter at twitter.com/nationalffa.

                                                                

This Week in Agribusiness, April 29, 2017

Part 1

Max Armstrong opens this week's show by congratulating Sonny Perdue, the newly confirmed Secretary of Agriculture. Patrick Haggerty reports on Sonny Perdue being sworn in, where Secretary Perdue rolled up his sleeves, and reminds people he was a farmer first. Nick Jensen, President, Thurston Manufacturing, tackles the Farm Challenge of the Week. And Farm broadcaster Duane Murley, KWMT Radio, from Fort Dodge, Iowa, offers insight into key issues farmers in that part of the country are watching.

Part 2

Max Armstrong talks markets with Paul Georgy, Allendale, Inc. In Samuelson Sez, Orion Samuelson wonders if any single-room schoolhouses are still operating. And Agricultural Meteorologist Greg Soulje looks at weather for the Western United States.

Part 3

Matt Coniglio, Penton Ag, talks about the many opportunities available at the National Agri-Marketing Association. Chad Colby reports on the crops in central and southern Illinois.

Part 4

Max Armstrong talks with Roberta Simpson-Dolbeare, Nebo, Illinois, about utilizing technology with smart farms. Ag Meteorologist Greg Soulje looks at weather for the Eastern United States. And in Max's Tractor Shed, Max tells the story of a 1951 John Deere B, owned by Rhett Whaley, Bloomfield, Indiana.

Part 5

Max Armstrong continues his market conversation with Paul Georgy, Allendale, Inc.

Part 6

Max Armstrong profiles Naperville Central FFA, Naperville, Illinois, this 25-member chapter formed in 1938. And Ag Meteorologist Greg Soulje looks at the weather for the week ahead, including his four-week forecast.

Part 7

In Freeways to Farms with Max Armstrong, Max talks with Jamie Walter, Whiskey Acres, about how he uses technology to maximize his operation. More episodes of Freeways to Farms can be found online at Freewaystofarms.com.

1951 John Deere B

Max Armstrong tells the story of a 1951 John Deere B, owned by Rhett Whaley, Bloomfield, Indiana.

Max's Tractor Shed is a regular feature of This Week in Agribusiness. Max Armstrong shares information about legacy machines, their stories and how they may still be at work today. If you have a tractor you want featured in Max's Tractor Shed, send a high-resolution digital picture, your contact information, and information about the tractor - what makes it special - to [email protected].

MIDDAY-MidwestDigest-04-28-17

Max is wrapping things up at National Agri Marketing Association event in Dallas, Texas.

United Airlines settled with dragged passenger for undisclosed amount of money.

Simon the rabbit died in pet holding area of United Airlines. Former Playboy model from England is owner and said rabbit was healthy when put on flight in England.

What a difference four years can make. Boom ended and money dried up in Oklahoma.

Woman in Omaha gave birth at Omaha Zoo. Mom was still standing up because it happened so fast and Dad caught baby in a sweater.

MIDDAY-MidwestDigest-04-28-17

Max is wrapping things up at National Agri Marketing Association event in Dallas, Texas.

United Airlines settled with dragged passenger for undisclosed amount of money.

Simon the rabbit died in pet holding area of United Airlines. Former Playboy model from England is owner and said rabbit was healthy when put on flight in England.

What a difference four years can make. Boom ended and money dried up in Oklahoma.

Woman in Omaha gave birth at Omaha Zoo. Mom was still standing up because it happened so fast and Dad caught baby in a sweater.

MORNING-MidwestDigest-04-28-17

Max is wrapping things up in Dallas at National Agri-Marketing event.

What a difference four years can make. Four years ago Oklahoma's oil patch was booming. Republicans who control state government permanently reduced tax income rate and gave tax incentives to businesses. Now, the boom has ended and the money has dried up. Nearly 100 of the state's 513 school districts have moved to four-day weeks. State troopers are told not to fill their gas tanks.

United Airlines is trying to get dragged passenger ordeal behind them and settled with the 69-year-old passenger yesterday. Meanwhile, the airline is still dogged with questions about what happened to Simon, the giant rabbit, who died while in the care of the airline. He was alive when landed in Chicago and it died as waited for flight to Kansas City. Three-foot-long Simon was expected to be the world's biggest rabbit.

Alcohol banned in Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, but allowed across the border in Nebraska. Officials there are trying to ban.

Chances are you've ate at a Waffle House, there are 1,500 across the country. The owners have recently passed away.

Farm Progress America, April 28, 2017

FarmProgressAmerica_FeatureIMG

The North American Free Trade Agreement has been in the news lately and Max Armstrong offers a look at what the agreement has meant to farmers, and other industries in the U.S. Exports to those countries have grown three-fold as imports grew six fold in the same time period. He shares a list of the top ag products sold to Canada and Mexico.

Farm Progress America is a daily look at key issues in agriculture. It is produced and presented by Max Armstrong, veteran farm broadcaster and host of This Week in Agribusiness.

Meat Market Update | Choice cutout trends higher; PLUS: Export update

Choice cutout returns to a higher trend associated with grilling, but also were supported by a very big weekly jump in exports and a big recent decline in Fresh Beef Imports. April Box Beef export numbers continue to follow the increase that was progressing during the first quarter and are not inhibited by the higher value of the dollar.