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Articles from 2008 In July


2008 Alliance Yellow Pages

Sponsored by Elanco Animal Health

2008 marks BEEF magazine’s 11th annual listing of industry alliances. In this special section, 34 programs are detailed – categorized by consumer-based programs, where the focus is on finding, feeding and marketing cattle according to predefined consumer product specifications; or calf-based programs, where calves are procured to fit specific value requirements. The listings include contact information, history, specifications for each of these top, value-based marketing programs.

View the 2008 Alliance Yellow Pages HERE (.pdf)

Correction in this year's yellow pages: Verified Beef's phone number was incorrectly listed. The correct number is 406-922-BEEF. Thank you.

Beef

Oklahoma Limousin Junior Wins Wulf Scholarship

Jonathan Temple-Lee, Maysville, Okla., received the fourth annual Leonard and Vi Wulf Scholarship at the National Junior Limousin Show and Congress (NJLSC) in Sioux Falls, S.D. Kent Andersen, Ph.D., executive vice president for the North American Limousin Foundation (NALF), made the announcement during the awards banquet July 18.

Temple-Lee, 18, has been a member of both the North American Limousin Junior Association (NALJA) and Oklahoma Junior Limousin Association for nine years. He will use the $500 Wulf scholarship to pursue studies in microbiology at Oklahoma State University. After graduation, he plans to attend medical school with the goal of becoming a rural physician.

“He is an impressive young man in his interactions with other students and adults,” wrote William Martin, superintendent of Maysville Public Schools, in recommending Temple-Lee for the scholarship. “He is a positive role model for our younger students.”

Mark Squires, office administrator at Express Ranches, Yukon, Okla., added that Temple-Lee’s experiences in building, feeding, breeding and marketing his cattle herd will be helpful as he continues to develop his life skills.

“I look forward to the great things that this fine young man will accomplish in the next few years,” Squires said.

Leonard and Vi Wulf, the founders of Wulf Limousin Farms, Morris, Minn., enabled the scholarship fund. They and their family have had a leading role in making the Limousin breed one of the top six in the United States.

Leonard Wulf started his cattle herd in 1949. In 1970, he began mating cows by artificial insemination (AI), which he believed was fundamental to herd improvement, to two Limousin bulls imported from France to Canada. Through a phenomenal work ethic, innovation and customer service, he built one of the largest and most successful seedstock enterprises in the nation before his death in 2003.

To celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2004, BEEF magazine recognized Wulf as one of the top 40 individuals who had helped build a dynamic and exciting beef industry by enhancing production efficiency, developing new marketing tools, improving beef quality and pushing the boundaries of science.

The North American Limousin Foundation (www.nalf.org), headquartered in Centennial, Colo., provides programs and services – including genetic evaluation of 5,000 active sires – to more than 4,000 members and their commercial customers. The Limousin breed and its Lim-Flex® hybrid lead the beef industry in muscle-growth efficiency and ideally complement British breeds.

###

North American Limousin Foundation

7383 S. Alton Way, Suite 100

Centennial, CO 80112-2339

(303) 220-1693 ¦ www.nalf.org

For immediate release

July 25, 2008

Contact Brad Parker

[email protected]

Beef

’08–’09 Limousin Junior Board Begins Term of Service

The 2008–2009 North American Limousin Junior Association (NALJA) Board of Directors took office July 18 at the conclusion of the National Junior Limousin Show and Congress (NJLSC) awards banquet in Sioux Falls, S.D.

Stephen Getz, Scherr, W.Va., and Alissa Johnson, Ashton, Iowa, return for their second two-year terms on the Board. New members are Nathan Hicks, Midway, Ky.; Michael Mitchell, Mangum, Okla.; and Megan Werner, Waco, Neb.

Shayla Carmichael, Midland, Texas; Mindin Ferguson, Wheatland, Calif.; Thadd Fosdick, Chenoa, Ill.; Katie Hefner, Seminole, Okla.; and Cassidy Woodard, Calhan, Colo., begin the second year of their current terms.

The NALJA “electoral college” selected Ferguson as president for the coming year. The Board then elected its remaining officers: vice president, Johnson; secretary, Woodard; treasurer, Getz; and reporter, Fosdick. As immediate past president, Corinne Harrison, Minier, Ill., will continue to serve as an ex officio member of the Board.

Kelvin Moreno, Miami, Fla.; Kayleesue Patton, Hillsboro, Ohio; and Rachel Wulf-Marthaler, Hastings, Minn., retired from the Board at the banquet.

The North American Limousin Foundation (www.nalf.org), headquartered in Centennial, Colo., provides programs and services – including genetic evaluation of 5,000 active sires – to more than 4,000 members and their commercial customers. The Limousin breed and its Lim-Flex® hybrid lead the beef industry in muscle-growth efficiency and ideally complement British breeds.

###

North American Limousin Foundation

7383 S. Alton Way, Suite 100

Centennial, CO 80112-2339

(303) 220-1693 ¦ www.nalf.org

For immediate release

July 25, 2008

Contact Brad Parker

[email protected]

Contact [email protected] to request photos from the NJLSC

(indicate which images you want and if you need them in color or grayscale mode).

Beef

Limousin Junior Showmen Honored

For two days, showmanship judges Chris and Kristi Effling of Highmore, S.D., watched the exhibitors at the National Junior Limousin Show and Congress (NJLSC) in Sioux Falls, S.D., as they led their cattle in the steer, bred-and-owned, Lim-Flex® and owned-female shows. The husband-wife team then invited back 10 juniors, 10 intermediates and 10 seniors to parade animals in the showmanship division finals July 16 and 17. As an added test of skill in the Senior Division, the finalists had just 30 minutes before entering the showring to fit their animals while the judges observed.

Megan Greenawalt, Lynchburg, Ohio, won the title of 2008 senior showmanship champion. Morgan Ratliff, Westphalia, Kan., claimed highest honors in the Intermediate Division. Cody Heavin, Springfield, Mo., worked his way to the top of the Junior Division.

The other senior finalists were Lance Bierlink, Blaine, Wash.; Kimberely Diehm, Avilla, Ind.; Scott Edwards, Corder, Mo.; Austen Etherton, Dawson, Ill.; Corinne Harrison, Minier, Ill.; Alissa Johnson, Ashton, Iowa; Lee Roy Lawrence, Anton, Texas; Amanda Lindsey, Spirit Lake, Iowa; and Jordan Straight, Logan, Iowa.

In the Intermediate Division, the other finalists were Eric Birkner, Solgohachia, Ark.; Kelsey Delaplaine, Gettysburg, Pa.; Molly Greenawalt, Lynchburg, Ohio; Kendall Harsh, Crescent, Okla.; Sarah Johnson, Williamsport, Ohio; Jordan Leatherman, Muskogee, Okla.; Darci Lundquist, Alsen, N.D.; Tanner Schmidt, Grandview, Texas; and Travis Wulf, Morris, Minn.

The other junior finalists were Rachel Booth, Miami, Okla.; Blair Davis, Brownwood, Texas; Kyle Delaplaine, Gettysburg, Pa.; Troy Holdman, Sundown, Texas; Chase Ratliff, Westphalia, Kan.; Cheyanne Ratliff, Westphalia, Kan.; Madison Ratliff, Westphalia, Kan.; Reagan Taylor, Fort Worth, Texas; and Hope Tira, Lynchburg, Ohio.

The North American Limousin Foundation (www.nalf.org), headquartered in Centennial, Colo., provides programs and services – including genetic evaluation of 5,000 active sires – to more than 4,000 members and their commercial customers. The Limousin breed and its Lim-Flex® hybrid lead the beef industry in muscle-growth efficiency and ideally complement British breeds.

###

North American Limousin Foundation

7383 S. Alton Way, Suite 100

Centennial, CO 80112-2339

(303) 220-1693 ¦ www.nalf.org

For immediate release

July 24, 2008

Contact Brad Parker

[email protected]

Contact [email protected] to request photos from the NJLSC

(indicate which images you want and if you need them in color or grayscale mode).

Beef

Illinois Junior Limousin Exhibitor Earns O’Brien Award

Corinne Harrison, 22, of Minier, Ill., received the Dick O’Brien Memorial Junior Herdsman Award at the National Junior Limousin Show and Congress (NJLSC) in Sioux Falls, S.D. The North American Limousin Junior Association (NALJA) presented the award at its annual awards banquet July 18.

State Limousin junior advisors nominate NJLSC exhibitors for the O’Brien Award to recognize a superior job of caring for animals, interacting with others, meeting the public and demonstrating maturity. First presented in 1996, the award honors the memory of Limousin enthusiast Dick O’Brien. With more than 30 years in the breed, the O’Brien family from Missouri has one of the nation’s pioneer Limousin herds.

The North American Limousin Foundation (www.nalf.org), headquartered in Centennial, Colo., provides programs and services – including genetic evaluation of 5,000 active sires – to more than 4,000 members and their commercial customers. The Limousin breed and its Lim-Flex® hybrid lead the beef industry in muscle-growth efficiency and ideally complement British breeds.

###

North American Limousin Foundation

7383 S. Alton Way, Suite 100

Centennial, CO 80112-2339

(303) 220-1693 ¦ www.nalf.org

For immediate release

July 24, 2008

Contact Brad Parker

[email protected]

Contact [email protected] to request photos from the NJLSC

(indicate which images you want and if you need them in color or grayscale mode).

Beef

Sweepstakes Points Tallied at National Junior Limousin Show

Sarah Johnson of Williamsport, Ohio, won the participation sweepstakes at the National Junior Limousin Show and Congress (NJLSC) in Sioux Falls, S.D., July 12–18. The 13-year-old won the Junior Division public-speaking and photography competitions and placed second in the Junior Division judging competition. She also led the Class 23 winner in the bred-and-owned Limousin bull show and was an Intermediate Division showmanship finalist.

Rounding out this year’s “top 10” were Alissa Johnson, Ashton, Iowa, second; Madison Yandell, Wichita Falls, Texas, third; Jordan Straight, Logan, Iowa, fourth; Eric Birkner, Solgohachia, Ark., fifth; Blair Davis, Brownwood, Texas, sixth; Troy Holdman, Sundown, Texas, seventh; Rachel Booth, Miami, Okla., and Jordan Leatherman, Muskogee, Okla., tied for eighth; Blane Counsil, Madisonville, Texas, ninth; Jordan Dye, Paola, Kan., and Sean Schuler, Cleveland, Texas, tied for tenth.

Texas won the team sweepstakes, followed by Oklahoma, then Kansas.

Individuals earned sweepstakes points by exhibiting animals, qualifying for the showmanship finals, and participating in the public-speaking, photography and judging competitions. State teams gathered points from herdsmanship, a group class in the cattle show, the Limousin Beef Cook-Off and the public-speaking competition.

The North American Limousin Foundation (www.nalf.org), headquartered in Centennial, Colo., provides programs and services – including genetic evaluation of 5,000 active sires – to more than 4,000 members and their commercial customers. The Limousin breed and its Lim-Flex® hybrid lead the beef industry in muscle-growth efficiency and ideally complement British breeds.

North American Limousin Foundation

7383 S. Alton Way, Suite 100

Centennial, CO 80112-2339

(303) 220-1693 ¦ www.nalf.org

Contact Brad Parker

[email protected]

###

Contact [email protected] to request photos from the NJLSC

(indicate which images you want and if you need them in color or grayscale mode).

Beef

Six Hundred Youth Compete in 2008 VitaFerm Junior National Hereford Expo

Contact: Chris Stephens, [email protected] or (816) 842-3757

July 24, 2008

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- National Junior Hereford Association (NJHA) members and their families made the 2008 VitaFerm Junior National Hereford Expo (JNHE), July 12-19 in Kansas City, the largest Hereford show in the world. More than 2,000 attendees celebrated “Herefords -- the Heart of America” at the American Royal complex. Six hundred NJHA members, ranging in ages from 7 to 22, representing 40 states and Canada, exhibited 1,100 head of cattle, making the event one of the largest junior breed shows in the nation.

The Arkansas, Illinois and Missouri Hereford and Junior Hereford Associations, teamed with the American Hereford Association (AHA), to host the ninth JNHE. The week long event had something for everyone, from 3-on-3 basketball competition to a Great American Hereford Grill-off. “Participants not only show cattle, they compete in educational contests, interview for college scholarships, run for leadership positions and network at social activities,” says Chris Stephens, American Hereford Association director of youth activities. “More than $25,000 in scholarships was awarded during the event. This will help prepare NJHA members to be leaders in the beef industry and their respective communities.” Next year’s JNHE will be in Tulsa, Okla., July 4-11, 2009.

The 2008 VitaFerm Junior National Hereford Expo was sponsored in part by BioZyme Inc., St. Joseph, Mo.; Fort Dodge Animal Health, Overland Park, Kan.; and UMB Bank and the RC Kemper Charitable Trust, Kansas City, Mo.

The NJHA is one of the most active junior programs in the country with approximately 3,000 members. The NJHA’s mission is to create and promote enthusiasm for the breed while

providing opportunities through leadership, education and teamwork. For more information about the NJHA, visit www.jrhereford.org.

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For JNHE pictures and additional news releases, visit www.herefordphotoshop.com/media. Enter “Junior08” when prompted for a password.

The Supply Debate And The National Elections

This debate over supply (discussed in the item, “Demand, Not Supply, Is The Key In The Short Term,”) is now front and center in national politics and promises to be for quite some time.

It also explains why the environmental movement has had such anti-capitalist leanings at its core. The chasm between business/standard of living and radical environmentalism will only continue to grow.

Global warming isn’t a cause; it’s a symptom of the fundamental difference between capitalism and environmentalism. It isn’t simply the extraction and use of fossil fuels that the environmental movement sees as the problem, but society’s quest for more. To this sector, capitalism, private property rights, globalism and uneven distribution of rewards are all problematic.

It shouldn’t be a surprise then that energy policy, environmentalism and wealth distribution are near the top of the list in this year’s election, and why there are such large fundamental differences on foreign policy issues. National security and strategic objectives aren’t the same between these schools of thought.

America is in the crosshairs in more ways than one, whether it be traditional religion, socialism or environmentalism. America is seen as the great Satan; we’ve become the bastion of Christianity among the developed nations, and the protector of Judaism through our traditional support of Israel.

We’re the beacon of light for capitalism, which destroyed acceptance of socialism in the old U.S.S.R. and in China. More importantly we’ve impeded socialism in Europe and other countries, as we became the reservoir for capital flows escaping these socialistic trends.

It’s believed that if America abandons its capitalistic values, socialism would be able to prosper. And ironically, as socialism grows in the U.S., Europe is increasingly embracing capitalism and trending more conservative.

To radical elements of the environmental movement, America is a symbol of the greed and decadence it opposes. It is why the populist rhetoric both within our industry and on a national level has begun to have such a widespread audience.

Most importantly, unlike other democracies, the U.S. has been unique in its two-party system. There is no role for a third party, with the possible exception of playing the spoiler. All democracies are by their essence coalition governments, but the Democratic and Republican coalitions have become entrenched relative to religion, economic systems and the environment.

It’s no accident that the Democratic Party must pass all its policies through the litmus tests of its coalition players – primarily big labor and the environmental movement. Meanwhile, the Republicans’ coalition of big business and evangelical Christians currently holds sway in determining Republican policy.

It makes for the most interesting political dynamics of any time in U.S. history. The majority party dictates policy, while the minority party is relegated to making its case for the upcoming election. As long as the power to gain the majority is relatively equal, the minority party can serve as a moderator of sorts.

That’s why this current election cycle is so different than any other. This election cycle is tailor made for the Democrats and they’re expected to pick up around 15 seats in Congress. The current president is highly unpopular, and this election is seen as Obama’s to win or lose.

McCain supporters are lukewarm, as they view him as having consistently thumbed his nose at the Republican coalition of big business and evangelical Christians. On the other hand, Obama is the poster child for big labor, the environmental movement and their socialistic leanings.

The result is neither side can wage this election on ideological grounds; Republicans don’t have a candidate that truly espouses their ideology; Democrats don’t have a candidate whose ideology is mainstream enough for the majority of Americans.

Both sides seem quite content making this election a referendum on an Obama presidency, based not on ideals but on likeability, charisma and experience. The irony is that neither party is willing to discuss the change their candidate truly represents.

McCain is the change likely to fade away in four or eight years, while Obama offers change that promises to fundamentally alter the political landscape of our country. Will the cheers that surely will go up in the streets of Europe and the Middle East on the Wednesday following the election translate to cheers in American streets down the road?

Opinion polls say Americans want change, and they’re being offered two significantly different kinds of change.

McCain represents a move away from these dominant coalitions and a more pragmatic approach to the key issues talked about above. He’s a moderate, a repudiation of the trend of polarization and the direction the two-party system has been heading. Meanwhile, an Obama presidency, coupled with super majorities in the House and Senate, promises a leftward shift to a magnitude unseen since the Great Depression.

Blaming Biofuels For Food Prices Ignores Reality

It’s becoming rather tiresome – the war of words and press releases as to whether the diversion of millions of bushels of grains to biofuels production has been a major factor in the steep increase in food prices.

The charges and counter-charges range from reasonably rational to downright incredible.

In the latter category, a British newspaper, The Guardian, made public prior to last week’s G-8 conference of industrialized nations what it said was a “secret” report by the World Bank that use of grains for biofuels has been responsible for 75% of the run-up in food prices. Another 15% of the increase was blamed on higher energy and fertilizer prices.

“Without the increase in biofuels, global wheat and maize stocks would not have declined appreciably, and price increases due to other factors would have been moderate,” the report said. The higher prices – up 140% between 2002 and February 2008 – have pushed 100 million people worldwide below the poverty line, it said.

The article, quickly disseminated worldwide by news organizations and internet bloggers, alleged that the report was suppressed by the World Bank “to avoid embarrassing President George Bush” (the U.S. government’s estimates have been that biofuels have increased food prices by only 3%).

While the story provided choice fodder for groups (among them the Grocery Manufacturers of America) agitating for the U.S. and other industrialized nations to scale back biofuels programs, it turned out that the British newspaper story was somewhat less than accurate.

Donald Mitchell, the World Bank senior economist who wrote the report, said it was only a working paper still undergoing peer review and didn’t represent the bank’s official position.

A bank spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal’s blog, “Environmental Capital,” that the 75% figure was “probably at the far end” of estimates of the impact of biofuels on food prices. “Other people talk about ranges of 20%, 25% – there’s some at the lower end that I think are less credible.”

Regardless, it takes a long stretch of the imagination to lay 75%, or even 20-25%, of the blame for spiraling food prices on the use of grains for biofuels.

While it stands to reason that higher prices for grains – particularly corn, which is a part of so many food products – have had some impact on food costs, by far the greatest contributor to those higher costs has been energy. $140 oil, which touches every aspect of food from seed to supermarket purchase, is the 800-lb. gorilla responsible for most of the food-price inflation.

Not that it makes a lot of difference to the naysayers, but … in 2007 U.S. farmers produced a record 13.1 billion bu. of corn, 22% of which was used for ethanol. Still, there was enough left to meet domestic needs, achieve record exports, and have a 10% surplus.

Had not a single bushel of corn gone to ethanol, food prices would still have risen because of the tremendous burden of $100+ oil, burgeoning world demand for grains, and crop failures due to drought and other disasters.