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Articles from 2008 In August


Beef

2008 World Rabies Day to Raise Awareness About This Disease

Merial Joins Alliance to Heighten Understanding, Encourage Rabies Prevention

DULUTH, GA. — August 20, 2008— For its second year, Merial will partner with international rabies experts to acknowledge World Rabies Day on September 28, 2008. A global effort that raises awareness in support of animal and human rabies prevention, World Rabies Day is intended to educate people around the globe about the impact of rabies, how it can be prevented and how to eliminate the sources that contribute to the death of 55,000 humans from rabies worldwide.1

“Merial is excited to be a corporate sponsor of the 2008 World Rabies Day and is proud to offer experience and expertise as a world leader in rabies prevention,” says Dr. Frank Hurtig, DVM, MBA, Director, Merial Veterinary Services. “We want to help protect horses, livestock and their owners from the devastating effects of rabies by providing educational materials, prevention tips and information about rabies to veterinarians and their clients.”

Living in pastures, feedyards or barns, cattle and horses can interact with wild animals — putting them at risk for infection with rabies. Infected animals may show signs of two different forms of rabies, “paralytic” or “furious.”2 Most common in horses is the paralytic or “dumb” rabies,2 signs of which include drooling, depression, anorexia and difficulty swallowing.3 Animals with the furious form may display a lack of coordination, colic and even aggressiveness.3 Once infected, it is possible for cattle and horses to transmit rabies to other animals and people. Because rabies is 100% fatal in livestock and nearly always fatal for humans,3 the best way to prevent it is through vaccination.

Nearly 7,000 cases of rabies were reported in animals in 2006,4 prompting the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) to revise its core vaccination guidelines to add rabies.5 Merial continues to be active in the fight against this disease, administering more than 100 million doses of RABORAL V-RG®, a specialized, safe oral vaccine approved for immunization of raccoons and coyotes. Merial provides more than 400 million doses of IMRAB® rabies vaccine, which is approved for use in six species.6 In fact, 2008 marks 25 years of trusted rabies protection with IMRAB.

In addition to raising awareness about rabies and vaccination as a potential method of prevention, Merial will continue its support of the Student American Veterinary Medical Association (SAVMA). Last year, Merial and SAVMA launched a contest with the winning school to be awarded an on-site rabies symposium, sponsored by Merial, in 2008.

“World Rabies Day gives us an excellent opportunity to do what we do best,” Dr. Hurtig says. “It gives us the opportunity to join with other leading health industry organizations in the common goal of raising awareness about and preventing rabies.”

Other World Rabies Day partners include the Alliance for Rabies Control (ARC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). For more information about rabies and World Rabies Day, visit www.rabiesawareness.com and www.worldrabiesday.org .

Merial is a world-leading, innovation-driven animal health company, providing a comprehensive range of products to enhance the health, well-being and performance of a wide range of animals. Merial employs approximately 5,000 people and operates in more than 150 countries worldwide. Its 2007 sales were nearly $2.5 billion. Merial Limited is a joint venture between Merck & Co., Inc. and sanofi-aventis. For more information, please see www.merial.com.

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®IMRAB and RABORAL V-RG are registered trademarks of Merial. ã2008 Merial Limited. Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. LAGEBIM807 (08/08).

1World Rabies Day Mission. Available at: http://run4rabies.org/EN/World_Rabies_Day_Mission.html. Accessed July 1, 2008.

2Weese JS. A review of equine zoonotic diseases: Risks in veterinary medicine. AAEP Proceedings 2002;48:362-369.

3Marteniuk J. Rabies in horses. Michigan State university College of Veterinary Medicine. Available at: old.cvm.msu.edu/extension/equine/RabiesinHorses.pdf. Accessed June 16, 2008.

4Blanton JD, Hanlon CA, et al. Rabies surveillance in the United States during 2006. JAVMA 2007;231(4):540-556.

5Guidelines for vaccination of horses. American Association of Equine Practitioners. Available at: www.aaep.org/vaccination_guidelines.htm. Accessed July 2, 2008.

6Data on file with Merial.

Are We Losing Control Of Our Business Decisions?

Watching the Democratic National Convention this week, I began to wonder if politics has become so much about the pursuit of power that it has little time for anything else. Until hearing the Democratic speeches, for instance, I didn’t realize to what abysmal Third-World depths the American quality of life has descended, how much our economy resembles the darkest times of the Great Depression (even though our economy grew at a rather robust 3.3% rate in the second quarter), or how loathed our beloved U.S. has become in the world.

No, as is the case with every election, this one is the most important of all, and winning is the only thing. And it is perception, not reality, that counts.

Certainly, a case can be made that political parties differ significantly enough on critical issues regarding our industry that it’s important to have the right party in the majority. However, the overall trend, whether a Republican or Democrat is in the White House, or regardless of which party controls Congress, is moving in the same direction. And that trend is that government involvement is becoming more and more intrusive.

That’s true whether it’s governmental entities negotiating the opening of foreign markets, deciding how we will label our products, market them or raise them. They determine how much we import and export, how we raise our product, and what our input costs will be.

Intervening in the marketplace at the behest of certain segments or issues, be it on the environment, endangered species, animal welfare, etc., is increasingly becoming the norm. Mandatory country of origin labeling, ethanol, the National Animal Identification System – these are all examples of things the marketplace would either never do or do so very reluctantly.

The government has now become as big a factor for producers to consider when making strategic and marketing plans as the classical supply and demand constraints.

We have a little over two months of political rhetoric to wade through before Nov. 4. While the rhetoric may not impact us in production ag, the policies ultimately will. This election is truly critical because recent trends indicate the results will drastically shape what our industry will look like in five to 10 years.

Consider Early Weaning In Areas Experiencing Drought

Ranchers experiencing significant reductions in forage production because of dry weather conditions should consider early weaning as a management tool, says a North Dakota State University (NDSU) cattle expert.

"Early weaning also should be considered as a management tool to improve or manipulate body condition, especially in young or thin cows," says Greg Lardy, NDSU Extension Service beef cattle specialist. "Time of weaning will have impacts on cow and calf performance, as well as health and productivity of the native range or pasture."

Producers will need to consider the advantages and disadvantages of early weaning to see if that option will work for them.

The advantages include:

  • Improved cow body condition. By weaning early, the cow's nutrient requirements for lactation are eliminated and cows are able to maintain or increase body condition prior to the fall and winter feeding period.
  • Improved calf performance. In some cases, calves may not be able to compete successfully with cows for adequate forage. By weaning early and providing a highly nutritious diet, calves can reach their growth potential. Early weaning, coupled with feeding a high-concentrate diet, has resulted in increased quality grade at slaughter, according to research conducted at several universities.
  • Improved forage availability for the cow. Early weaning reduces the cow's dry-matter intake and eliminates the calf's demand on the forage. Consequently, the cows remaining on the pasture have access to more forage and demands on the pasture are reduced, which can enhance sustainability and forage production in the future.
The disadvantages of early weaning are:
  • Increased attention to management is required. Early weaning requires greater attention to proper health, nutrition and management practices.
  • Increased labor requirement. Early weaning will require additional labor to feed and manage the calves. Another option is to ship them to a custom feedlot; however, this will add to the cash costs incurred.
  • Increased cash costs. Weaning calves earlier will result in increased cash costs for the rancher or beef cattle producer. Instead of pasture and their mother's milk, early-weaned calves will be fed high-quality grains, hays, protein supplements and/or commercially prepared feeds. In addition, beef-cattle producers must have facilities to feed calves or hire a custom backgrounder or feedlot to do this work.
"Early weaning is one management option that should be considered as a means to manage cow body condition," Lardy says. "Early weaning will be more successful and less stressful when adequate attention to nutrition, health, management and facilities is considered."

Go to www.ag.ndsu.edu/disaster/drought/earlyweeningcalves.html for more info.
-- NDSU release

Cost Cutting: Five Places To Save, Five Places To Spend

Like never before, ranchers are faced with increasing costs of production, and it’s causing many of them to rethink their production strategies. But, while they may be pressured to slash costs randomly as they look ahead to winter herd management, cutting costs just for cost-cutting sake may not be the best approach.

Ron Gill, Texas AgriLife Extension livestock specialist, and John Paterson, Montana State University Extension beef specialist, were asked to take a look at some places to save money and places spend money this winter. Here are their suggestions in no particular order:

Five places to save

  • Cut hay waste.
  • Feed more crop residue. In many parts of the country, straw is an overlooked feed resource – especially for cows in early gestation. Consider using wheat or barley straw at about 75% of the ration on an as-fed basis with 25% alfalfa hay through the second trimester of gestation.

    “Save the good alfalfa hay for when you need it most – just before, during and after the calving season,” Paterson says.

    The same can be said for corn stover. Once the crop is harvested, half the feed energy remains in the field. Most cornfields will provide 1-2 months of grazing/cow/acre.

    However, anytime straw is fed or crop residues are grazed, cows should be monitored closely and body condition scores (BCS) recorded, so that necessary supplementation can take place when required.

    Long-stem straw has a very low digestibility and grinding of straw increases consumption. This leads to higher digestible energy intakes – and added cost, which needs to be penciled-out.

    Take the time to get to know your cow herd better and sort them into feeding groups. Cows need to consume forage at the rate of 2-3% of their body weight to have a chance of maintaining performance.

    Dry beef cows will need a diet that is 8% protein in the middle third of pregnancy and 9% protein in the last third. Pregnant yearling heifers require at least an 11-12% protein diet, while heifers and cows nursing calves need a diet that contains at least 12% protein.

    Paterson says surveys show ranchers tend to underestimate the weight of their cows by as much as 20%. “This makes a huge difference when you’re feeding a herd that averages 1,450 lbs./cow vs. what you think might be 1,200 lbs./cow.” You can be far more efficient if you know the true average weight of your cows going into the winter.

    He also says overfeeding heifers can cost money. In most instances, heifers need to gain 1-1½ lbs./day from weaning to the start of the breeding season. They only need to be 60% of mature body weight going into the breeding season and 85% of mature weight when they calve as a two-year old.

    Learn how to BCS your cows. Body condition should be evaluated and recorded three times annually: at weaning, 60-90 days before calving, and at calving. By assigning BCS scores at the time of weaning, the cows can be sorted for appropriate feeding.

    Manage nutrition to prevent middle-aged cows from dropping below BCS 4 during the production cycle, Gill says. “Younger cows should be held at about BCS 5.” He adds that money can be saved, especially during a drought, by culling lower BCS cows early and allowing the rest of the herd to maintain body condition on standing forage.

    Altering body condition takes time. One body condition score is equal to about 60-80 lbs. of bodyweight in small- to moderate-frame cows. Large-frame cows require 100-150 lbs. of body weight to change a single condition score.

    Paterson says protein and/or energy is often supplemented because it makes the rancher feel good. “But this may not be the best strategy for the cow and for herd profitability,” he says. “We need to get beyond traditional feeding regimes.”

    He challenges ranchers to hunker down with a calculator and begin assessing the costs of supplementation on a cost/lb. basis for both protein and energy.

    High-concentration protein supplements that are natural protein sources don’t need to be fed every day. “It might be advantageous, for example, to feed 1 lb. of a 40% protein vs. 2 lbs. of a 20% protein – saving delivery time and fuel,” Paterson explains.

    Know the nutrient requirements of your animals. Study nutritional charts and get a feel for what you need to supplement with and when. Underestimating forage nutritive value will lead to over-supplementation, Gill says.

    Also, the benefits from supplementation can be enhanced when supplemental feeding is started before the onset of cold weather. It is easier to alter cow BCS during mild, fall weather than during harsh, winter weather.

    Five places to spend

    Paterson and Gill agree that in each of their regions, mineral supplementation should be considered an investment in herd productivity and not necessarily a cost. Calcium, phosphorus and salt are likely to be the most limiting macro minerals in cattle diets.

    “Don’t stop supplementing phosphorus,” Gill stresses. “Phosphorus has a major impact on reproductive performance.” Cattle are more likely to be phosphorus-deficient during the winter, when they often subsist on dry forages. Concentrates contain moderate to high concentrations of phosphorus.

    Paterson says that while there may be times of the year protein or energy supplements may not be necessary, there is seldom a time when mineral supplementation isn’t necessary.

    Paterson recommends one of the first places to spend money is on a forage analysis by a commercial laboratory to help a rancher design a feeding program that will economically meet the requirements of the cow herd. This should include evaluation of the protein, energy and mineral composition of forages – whether range, pastures or hay.

    The most useful analysis reports for hay supplies should be based on a representative sample from each “lot” of hay – hay from one field that has been cut, handled, baled and stored under uniform conditions.

    Interpreting forage analysis reports is a two-part process, Paterson adds. “The first step is understanding the basic terminology and meaning of the report. The next step is to evaluate each lot’s ability to produce a desired level of animal performance."

    The cost of wintering an open cow or heifer – or even an extremely late-calving cow, can substantially increase wintering costs. Gill and Paterson say a place to spend money – and therefore save money – is to pregnancy test after weaning.

    Whether through ultrasound, palpation or the novel blood pregnancy test that’s commercially available, post-weaning pregnancy testing can pay off. Paterson says research from the Noble Foundation in Oklahoma shows the average value of pregnancy testing is nearly $80/cow.

    The National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) indicates that less than 20% of beef producers utilize pregnancy diagnosis in their cowherd.

    “Pregnancy testing is often overlooked by producers with smaller herds,” he says. “I would advise that all herds get pregnancy tested this fall.” Additionally, he says identifying non-pregnant females can help identify cows with disease-related fertility problems from the herd.

    Using growth-promoting implants is one of the most cost-effective methods of enhancing cattle gain and efficiency of gain. Paterson believes that more producers should evaluate and plan for the use of implants and ionophores.

    “This is a good place to spend – as it’s one of the best ways to gain production efficiency,” he says. “The use of implants and ionophores in cattle decreases the feed needed for growth and increases feed efficiency.”

    Gill says added gain through the use of growth implants averages 20-30 lbs./head. But, he adds, implanting must be done correctly by experienced producers. Implanting should also be a strategic decision – based on the sex of the calves, the market for calves and animals’ life stage.

    “Many implants are available, but selection of an implant is less critical than the decision on whether to implant,” Gill adds.

    Of course, if cattle are being raised for entry into a “natural” beef program, implanting and ionophores are normally not an option. And, Paterson says cattle must have adequate nutrition before implants or ionophores can positively influence feed efficiency and gain.

    Failure to address potential disease threats and prevent diseases will only compound the problems caused by increased operating costs. Parasite control, including attention to heel flies, horn flies, etc., should be considered through consultation with an attending veterinarian.

    Herd biosecurity has many components, Paterson says. These include vaccination for common diseases, strategic screening for diseases, nutrition and animal movement and handling.

    “We’ve shown in Montana that whole-herd screening for the bovine viral diarrhea virus as a component of herd biosecurity can be one of the most cost-effective investments a rancher can make,” Paterson says. “Money spent on herd health and preventing disease always pays off.”
  • Weigh and sort your cows.
  • Body condition scoring.
  • Strategic supplementation.
  • Mineral supplementation.
  • Forage analysis.
  • Pregnancy testing.
  • Implants and ionophores.
  • Herd biosecurity.
  • Paterson says to look at your operation from “30,000 ft.” and determine how much hay is being wasted, and where. He says large, round hay bale management systems often lead to the greatest and most consistent losses – up to more than 25% of its feeding value.

    “Minimizing hay loss begins with dense and well-formed bales and storing them on a well-drained site,” Paterson says. “Research shows site selection is more important than row orientation in cutting hay waste.”

    Deterioration at the bottom of bales stored on damp soil can be substantial. If round bales are stored individually, a space of at least 18 in. between bales is needed for air circulation.

    Storing bales with the rounded sides touching is not recommended because this creates a trap for rain and snow. And, while it makes bales a bit harder to handle with some equipment, losses will be higher if the round bales are stacked tightly end to end.

    And, Paterson says, make sure you know the true feed weight of the bales you’re feeding. “You’re headed for a wreck if you think your bales weigh 1,000 lbs., and they really weigh 800.”

Finding And Keeping Good Employees

The cost of replacing an employee averages about 150% of his salary, something few businesses can afford. “We live in a time when business owners can no longer wait for possible improvements to the economy. Gas prices, the rising costs of health care and the current mortgage crisis are adversely impacting small businesses,” says Laura Harris of Corpus Christi, TX, author of the forthcoming book “Surrender to Win – Regain Sanity by Strategically Relinquishing Control.” Here are a few of her tips to help your business stay profitable.

Tip #1: Make your employees a real part of the team. A business should work for the owner, not because of the owner’s demands. If you can “release control” to your employees, you can begin to have a company running on autopilot. Micromanage processes, not people.

Tip #2: Establish a clear vision of what success means for your company. Make sure every member of the team knows what the vision is and how their day-to-day work fits into the plan. Knowing that, they can contribute to its success.

Tip #3: Create knowledgeable employees with training. Train and cross-train. Each employee teaches the others how to handle their aspect of the business. That way no one is such a specialist he can hold the employer hostage. Employees should not want to be irreplaceable. If they are, they can’t even be promoted!

Tip #4: Update employee training annually. We have to re-invent our business often, or run the risk of becoming obscure. Include key employees in the planning process to keep consistent, well-defined programs in place. An employee trained years or even months ago will not understand today’s hot products and services.

Tip #5: After defining each business process, put it all in writing. Everyone should learn the most effective way to accomplish a process so the employee who uses that process is not the only person able to do it. Another should be able to take over if needed. And that includes the employer’s own processes – you should be able to go on vacation or away on business without having the company fall apart.

Tip #6: Your compensation system should reward employees for team results. Design your business so the team works together to fulfill goals. Encourage healthy competition, but ensure individual goals align with company goals. That alignment makes an employee part of the team, creating a harmonious atmosphere.

Tip #7: Hire enthusiastic candidates. Employees can be the best investment in the healthy growth of your business. Harris often tells prospective new hires “this is the last job you will ever have!” By creating an opportunity an employee would be crazy to leave, you attract team members you want. Accept a candidate with less experience if he has appropriate strengths and a positive attitude; he can be trained to do the job and you won’t have to break bad habits already learned.

“Leadership that revolves around the strength of the team, not the knowledge of the owner, creates long-term prosperity,” Harris says. For more info, go to www.lauraharris.com.
 

Beef

2008 World Rabies Day to Raise Awareness About This Disease

Merial Joins Alliance to Heighten Understanding, Encourage Rabies Prevention

DULUTH, GA. — August 20, 2008 — For its second year, Merial will partner with international rabies experts to acknowledge World Rabies Day on September 28, 2008. A global effort that raises awareness in support of animal and human rabies prevention, World Rabies Day is intended to educate people around the globe about the impact of rabies, how it can be prevented and how to eliminate the sources that contribute to the death of 55,000 humans from rabies worldwide.1

“Merial is excited to be a corporate sponsor of the 2008 World Rabies Day and is proud to offer experience and expertise as a world leader in rabies prevention,” says Dr. Frank Hurtig, DVM, MBA, Director, Merial Veterinary Services. “We want to help protect horses, livestock and their owners from the devastating effects of rabies by providing educational materials, prevention tips and information about rabies to veterinarians and their clients.”

Living in pastures, feedyards or barns, cattle and horses can interact with wild animals — putting them at risk for infection with rabies. Infected animals may show signs of two different forms of rabies, “paralytic” or “furious.”2 Most common in horses is the paralytic or “dumb” rabies,2 signs of which include drooling, depression, anorexia and difficulty swallowing.3 Animals with the furious form may display a lack of coordination, colic and even aggressiveness.3 Once infected, it is possible for cattle and horses to transmit rabies to other animals and people. Because rabies is 100% fatal in livestock and nearly always fatal for humans,3 the best way to prevent it is through vaccination.

Nearly 7,000 cases of rabies were reported in animals in 2006,4 prompting the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) to revise its core vaccination guidelines to add rabies.5 Merial continues to be active in the fight against this disease, administering more than 100 million doses of RABORAL V-RG®, a specialized, safe oral vaccine approved for immunization of raccoons and coyotes. Merial provides more than 400 million doses of IMRAB® rabies vaccine, which is approved for use in six species.6 In fact, 2008 marks 25 years of trusted rabies protection with IMRAB.

In addition to raising awareness about rabies and vaccination as a potential method of prevention, Merial will continue its support of the Student American Veterinary Medical Association (SAVMA). Last year, Merial and SAVMA launched a contest with the winning school to be awarded an on-site rabies symposium, sponsored by Merial, in 2008.

“World Rabies Day gives us an excellent opportunity to do what we do best,” Dr. Hurtig says. “It gives us the opportunity to join with other leading health industry organizations in the common goal of raising awareness about and preventing rabies.”

Other World Rabies Day partners include the Alliance for Rabies Control (ARC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). For more information about rabies and World Rabies Day, visit www.rabiesawareness.com and www.worldrabiesday.org.

Merial is a world-leading, innovation-driven animal health company, providing a comprehensive range of products to enhance the health, well-being and performance of a wide range of animals. Merial employs approximately 5,000 people and operates in more than 150 countries worldwide. Its 2007 sales were nearly $2.5 billion. Merial Limited is a joint venture between Merck & Co., Inc. and sanofi-aventis. For more information, please see www.merial.com.

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Contact:

Natasha Joseph Rachel Baum

Merial Bader Rutter & Assoc.

(678) 638-3690 (402) 434-5308

[email protected] [email protected]

®IMRAB and RABORAL V-RG are registered trademarks of Merial. ã2008 Merial Limited. Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. LAGEBIM807 (08/08).

1World Rabies Day Mission. Available at: http://run4rabies.org/EN/World_Rabies_Day_Mission.html. Accessed July 1, 2008.

2Weese JS. A review of equine zoonotic diseases: Risks in veterinary medicine. AAEP Proceedings 2002;48:362-369.

3Marteniuk J. Rabies in horses. Michigan State university College of Veterinary Medicine. Available at: http://old.cvm.msu.edu/extension/equine/RabiesinHorses.pdf. Accessed June 16, 2008.

4Blanton JD, Hanlon CA, et al. Rabies surveillance in the United States during 2006. JAVMA 2007;231(4):540-556.

5Guidelines for vaccination of horses. American Association of Equine Practitioners. Available at: www.aaep.org/vaccination_guidelines.htm. Accessed July 2, 2008.

6Data on file with Merial.

New Producer Video Profiles Available At BEEF TV

When 17 busloads of beef producers embarked on the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Summer Tour and Trade Show in Windom, MN on July 15, BEEF magazine was there. Now you can get a front-row seat of the tour highlights via five video profiles available at www.beefmagazine.com.

Sponsored by the Minnesota Cottonwood Cattle Producers, participants toured four cow-calf operations and three feedlots. Travelers witnessed prime examples of operations feeding naturally raised cattle, improving genetics, finding a niche market through boxed-beef sales, and even monitoring nutritional intake of livestock by adding electrolytes to the water.

BEEF intern Amanda Nolz also interviewed five producers for their feedback on the practices they witnessed on the tour, as well as their thoughts on the state of the beef industry. The videos from the event can be found on BEEF TV at beefmagazine.com/beeftv/.

National Beef Stocker Survey Results To Be Disclosed

Key findings of the National Stocker Survey, recently completed by BEEF magazine and 12 land-grant universities, is among the highlights of the K-State Beef Stocker Field Day, Oct. 2.

Registration is at 9:30 a.m., with the program beginning at 10:15 a.m. at Kansas State University’s (KSU) Beef Stocker Unit, located west of Manhattan on west Marlatt Ave.

The event, designed to give producers the latest practical info to help them adapt to recent significant changes in the beef industry, features:

  • Wes Ishmael, BEEF magazine, “Key Findings From the National Stocker Survey,” and
  • Denny Hausmann, Alpharma Animal Health, "Current Concepts in Medicated Feed Additives."
In addition, KSU Extension researchers and specialists will discuss:
  • New realities of conducting business in the stocker segment.
  • What’s the importance of temperature in diagnosing sickness.
  • Making rational choices for stocker therapy.
  • Use of byproducts for exploiting efficient performance.
  • The implications of heavier cattle being fed for shorter days.
  • A visual tour of the progression of pneumonia.
  • Proper injection considerations for quality beef assurance.
  • How much do cutting bulls really cost?
Info also will be available regarding ultrasound applications for earlier detection of quality cattle, the latest innovation in data collection and scale head technology; and cattle handling facilities.

Early registration is $25 if paid by Sept. 15. For more info or to register, contact Lois Schreiner at 785-532-1267 or [email protected]; or visit www.ksubeef.org.